Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Cast Spotlight – Felicity Adams-Hannigan

Felicity Adams-Hannigan or Fifi as most of us call her plays Kourtney, the hooker, in Kill Sister, Kill!

Tell us about yourself.

I play Kourtney the local hooker. I’ve envisioned her from the beginning as that party girl who came into the city from the suburbs one weekend, and just never took the train home.

This is the first time workshopping a musical for me, and my first time doing an original musical. Before this all of my work has been roles already originated by somebody else. This time I haven’t had anybody else’s interpretation influencing me, and that has been so scary, but so amazing at the same time. That being said, my favourite roles up until now have probably been Rossignol in Marat/Sade (Soup Can Theatre), Young Phyllis in Follies (Wavestage Theatre) and Pinkalicious in Pinkalicious the Musical (Vital Theatre).

How did you first hear about the production? 

I heard about the production through my friend Astrid (playing Kitty) who introduced me to Emily of Bygone Theatre through one of their Retro Radio Hours. I then met Michael the composer and musical director at a theatrical event in the city and he mentioned they were still searching for people and the rest is history. (Found out later at the same event I had met Jamie the director, but I didn’t know that’s who he was at the time). So, moral of the story: get your butt out to events! You never know what cool productions you’ll be hearing about.

What has been your favourite moment of the rehearsal process so far?

Hands down when our lovely director pointed at me and said “this, is a low level hooker”. Hopefully in reference to Kourtney, and not me.Tell us about your character – what do you love about her?

I liken Kourtney to a struggling actress. She knows she’s hooking in the minor leagues right now, but in her mind she’s just waiting for her big break. I’m loving her and mooky because they are much needed comedic relief in a very dark world.

Why do you think people should come see the show?

Because I’m in it, duh??!!
Okay, being serious, the feminist tones of the show appeal to me. I love that it’s a woman taking back the night. This is something I hold dear to my heart the older I get as I do not want my daughters (future tense) to live in a world where they think that if they are out late, or dress a certain way, or talk a certain way that they are asking for any kind of harassment from men.

Any funny rehearsal anecdotes to share?

When I sing high above the staff, I’ll admit it’s a challenge to even out my vibrato. One rehearsal Heather (Teresa) pointed out that I was an operatic hooker, and now during certain parts of songs I can’t stop giggling when I listen to myself.

Anything else we should know?

Just that this girl can now cross an item off her life “to do” list. NYC stage before age thirty!


Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Cast Spotlight – Samantha Walkes

Samantha Walks is starring as weapon of hellbent vengeance, Lily!

BIO: Samantha began her passion for theatre in high school which led her to perform for local community theatres in the area, and the Hamilton All-Star Jazz Band. Samantha was accepted to the American Musical and Dramatic Academy where she studied in LA and New York, making great strides in the industry. She took a break from theatre and returned to Canada in February of last year. At the start of 2015, Samantha decided to finally return to the stage and begin a career here at home. She formed a 70s-80s Motown, Disco group with her younger Sister, Candace, called Sister Walkes, which performs throughout the year with their 6 piece band. Her Canadian credits include: Three Testaments: Shalom, Pease, Salam (Niagara Falls, NY), Kill Sister, Kill (Bygone Theatre, New York City Fringe Festival), and The Man With the Womb (GRIP Media). Samantha gives all gratitude to God, her biggest supporter, closest friend and life partner.

Tell us a bit about your character.

I am playing the character, Lily. She is Kitty‘s older sister and is quite protective and concerned for the state of her soul. Ultimately, Lily had to be the mother they both never had and continues to feel responsible for Kitty. She is sweet, kind, considerate, nurturing and above all, want to do the Lord’s Will. This manifests in the ways she cares for the lost souls of New York City.

How did you first hear about the production?

I found a posting online that led me to the audition information. I wasn’t sure what to expect! But having lived in New York and knowing the hype that surrounds The Fringe Festival, I wanted to be apart of this project, no matter how big or small the role.

What has been your favourite moment of the rehearsal process so far?

The stage combat scenes with Ronnie and Dagger  have been a lot of fun. Making every hit feel real to the audience is my primary focus. When they can feel it in their gut, we have accomplished something worth celebrating.

 Tell us about your character – what do you love about her?

I love the closeness between the sisters and Lily’s love for God. My own Sister and my relationship with God are both very important to me and there are many events in Lily’s journey that parallel to my own life.

 Why do you think people should come see the show?

I think as human beings we are fascinated with suffering and punishment. We have a natural desire to see justice prevail. And so, the fall of an angel (Lily) and watching her struggle to find her way through the muck of life and it’s sufferings are worth more than the price of admission.

Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Crew Spotlight – Director Jamieson Child

Jamieson Child is co-writer and director of the show. Here he shares his thoughts on the process so far.

This is my third time directing this frigging show. You think I’d be sick of it by now. I’ve worked on numerous projects in the intervening years since my brother [Drac] and I first put on the earliest version of this show back in 2010 when it was nothing more than a very serious joke–but whether I’m acting, writing, or directing some other thing, I just keep coming back to Kill Sister, Kill!. I think we’re a little obsessed with our own idea and get too much joy freaking out an audience with new challenging material, mostly using humour and shock. I hate watching a lot theatre, but there is so much potential in the live format to grab people in their seats and give them a good shake, so this is me being a pissed off spectator wanting something entertaining out of the experience if I’m going to leave my house and spend more than $20.

A lot has happened since that first show and this time we’ve managed to assemble an amazing crew of very talented artists with a new perspective. Bygone Theatre helped us get the show back on its feet. Finding Mike Zahorak (Composer) and David Backshell (Lyricist) has launched us deeper into the depravity with more juice than ever before. They gave us the creative power we needed to expand and hear this story in a whole new way; now proudly, a full-length 90 minute musical. *Tears of joy.

However, this is my first time not acting in the show. I leave the character of Ronnie in better hands with Tom [Finn] anyway. So it goes. Taking off my performer cap was easy when he walked into the audition room. That’s how you know when you’re making the right decision out of a hard one…when the answer simply lands in your lap; it’s just following your instinct. I’d love to say that’s how easy my decision making process has been throughout the whole production so far, since I know the track so well, but we’ve changed the story so much, added new characters, big all-cast musical numbers, that I’ve been digging like a fiend into books, watching video, researching, pulling favours asking friends and colleagues for assistance wherever I need it. I’m lucky to be surrounded by a wicked cast who do more to empower me than they know. The true joy is in seeing our material come to life.

As for now, my excitement for taking Kill Sister, Kill! to the NYC Fringe off-Broadway stage is completely stunned by the colossal amount of work that remains to see this show reach the high level of thrilling performance that myself and my team demand from it. Will it be easy? No, but will we kick serious ass and blow minds? We’re ready for it.
I told you I like a challenge.

Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Crew Spotlight – Associate Producer, Tea Nguyen

Associate Producer Tea Nguyen joined the team about a month ago, coming into a project that has been steadily pumping along since October 2014. We asked her for some insights on the show and her process.

Some people would be intimidated by joining a team late. The team has already created bonds, had great moments together and they have the ball rolling. In joining the team, there was a slight moment of panic, as there is any project. Luckily, Kid Switchblade and Bygone Theatre has welcomed me onboard with open arms. As their associate producer, I work under Emily Dix. This will be my second time under her care and I must say, I’m very excited to return to New York with her to do our second New York International Fringe show. The show is dark, comical and tells a great story about two girls who have grown up under the grace of God and have gone in complete opposite directions in life. If you are squeamish or have a small stomach for gore, this isn’t the show for you. Watching these talented actors is so inspiring. We had a full day of learning stunt choreography and they gave it their all. Blood sweat and more sweat (referring to Thomas, playing Ronnie). They are eager to learn, thriving to do well and hungry to perform. I’m quite excited to see it all put together, yet enjoying the journey along the way.

Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Crew Spotlight – Lyricist, David Backshell

How did you get involved in KSK?
I had been friends with Drac for a couple of years; I was a a regular in his bar and I worked in a cafe down the street from where he lived. So when I released an EP earlier this year (called Halfsleeper), I played it for him, he dug the lyrics and asked me to help out. I had a meeting with his brother and director Jamieson and brought along some lyrics surrounding some general themes (some of which eventually got used in the show’s opener ‘Fuck This City!’). He liked the direction of them and I was pretty much hired.

What’s the creative process like for the lyrics like?
Typically it starts with a production meeting where the creative crew talk about content, structure, themes, what voices we are going to hear and character arcs that should be present in the songs. I go away and overwrite and essentially create a brain dump. I bring it back to Drac and Jameison  and they talk about what they like, dislike, what fits and what elements we should play up or play down. At this point the refining process begins until we are happy with the end product. I take it to Mike (the composer) and see how it works together with the music and we tweak things until it fits.

What’s the most challenging aspect of writing the lyrics for KSK?
Probably trying to incorporate all these distinct voices into a clear narrative. Trying to make each character’s voice well rounded but balanced to serve the story without making them cliched.

As a result I feel that Dagger and Kitty both have strong personalities but act very much as catalysts to the story. The repercussions of their actions often fall upon their respective siblings who find themselves picking up the pieces.

Who is the most exciting character to write for?
Ronnie, he’s arguably the most tragic character in the musical. Certainly the one that audience will be most sympathetic too. His voice also mirrors fairly closely the kind of lyrics I naturally write. I had a great time writing Ronnie’s lament, I feel it cuts to the core of his character and you see both his naivety, idealism also his weakness. He is a man that is lost in the world.

Who has been the most difficult character to write for?
Probably Lily, as she is a very schizophrenic character. In the first act she comes across as almost a Mother Theresa type character, doing her best to help those around her. In the second act, after the attack it’s hard to know where she is coming from. She’s incredibly violent and we are left wondering whether this is some kind of PTSD reaction, or is she really doing God’s work? Balancing this Old Testament style judgement against someone who has gone through traumatic events, while keeping them human is a hard act to get right.
Check out David’s own work on his website. Want to help support our show? Visit the show page to make a donation.

AUDITIONS – Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical

Bygone Theatre is currently accepting audition submissions for our upcoming production of Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical, set to premiere at the New York City International Fringe Festival August 2015.


Directed by Jamieson Child
Written by Drac Dillinger & Jamieson Child
Music by Mikey Zahorak
Produced by Emily Dix

A Psychotronic Hell-trip of Song, Sleaze and Revenge! A nun, doing God’s work on the filthy streets of 70s New York, reunites with her beloved sister to celebrate her wedding. Their night of revelry is despoiled by two vulgar, depraved sickos. Left for dead and robbed of her sister and her voice, the Woman of God rebuilds herself as a Weapon of Hellbent Vengeance!

Ronnie: A young punk, eager to impress his big brother, Ronnie isn’t the brightest, the baddest, or the best with the ladies, but he has a good heart.

Dagger: Ronnie’s older brother, Dag is a violent, drug-fueled psycho who uses & abuses everyone he’s with, including his little brother.

Lily: A god-fearing nun doing her best to clean up the streets of NYC. Sheltered & a little naive, the only family she has is her sister, Kitty.

Kitty: A born wild-child, Kitty has worked in Vegas as a “dancer”. While she loves her older sister, she is the complete opposite of Lily and spends her time drinking, dancing & screwing.

NOTE: As the show is still being completed, vocal ranges can vary. We are looking for performers with great character and a strong voice who are willing to workshop the show for a couple months and develop songs that will suit their voices.

To request an audition, please send your headshot & resume to Producer Emily Dix at, no later than Wednesday July 3, 2015. Those selected for an audition will be contacted to schedule a date and time in early June.

“Kill Sister Kill” – A Co-Pro with Kid Switchblade Productions

We are excited to announce that we will be teaming up with Kid Switchblade Productions to work on a dark new musical, Kill Sister Kill.


ABOUT THE SHOW: A nun, doing God’s work in the filthy streets of New York City in the late 1970s, reunites with her once-troubled sister to celebrate her engagement. The arrival of a vulgar, depraved punk and his kid brother despoils their happy reunion. After watching the murder of her sister and being brutally attacked herself, the Woman of God turns her attention to revenge, rebuilding herself as a hell-bent woman seeking vengeance.

The show premiered at the Toronto Fringe Festival in 2013 and is now being re-written and expanded with new music. Being produced by Bygone’s AD Emily Dix.


COMPANY INFO: Kid Switchblade Productions: If it isn’t offensive, it isn’t interesting. Kid Switchblade Productions are a brother-duo team of writer/ director, Andrew “Drac” and Jamieson Child (who you know as Rupert Cadell in our recent production of Rope). They are drawn to the dark, sleazy, horrific and hilarious, producing all things 1970’s low-budget cinema inspired. Previous original shows include No Commercial Interruptions (2010) and Sister, Sister (2009).

In order to expand the show, we need a new composer;

POSITION INFO: The composer will be responsible for the entire score of the musical, and may be asked to come on as music director as well. There may be an opportunity to assist with the writing of some lyrics. As this is a low-budget production, funding is relying significantly on fundraising and grants. Payment will depend on the success of these funding ventures and may only exist in a profit-share format.


* Formal music training

* Experience in composition

* Understanding of the Fringe circuit & amateur theatre scene

* Familiarity with 1970s genre & rock music as well as traditional musical theatre styles

* Ability to work quickly and effectively

* A positive attitude and sense of humour

OPPORTUNITY: The successful candidate will have an opportunity to be a key part of the creation of a new Canadian musical.

HOW TO APPLY: Send a resume along with a cover letter highlighting your musical experience and detailing why you would like to be involved with this production. Samples of previous work (score, video or cd) are strongly encouraged. Submissions should be sent to:

Emily Dix (Producer)

Deadline: January 30, 2015

We thank all applicants for their interest; those selected for an interview will be contacted mid-January.

Keep an eye on our facebook page for show updates!


Underneath It All: A Brief History of Women’s Underwear, 1900-1970

When dressing a period show, it is important to remember that it’s not just the clothing the audience sees that makes the look authentic. To really capture a realistic period style, the proper undergarments need to be used to help achieve the accurate shape or silhouette.

For those doing a show set in the first half of the 20th century, the following crash-course may be of some assistance.

The 1900s

As you can see in the photos above, the early 1900s embraced a truly “feminine” shape; big hips, large breasts, and a very cinched in “wasp waist”. The look was not quite as extreme as it had been in previous decades (where, in some cases, women may have had ribs removed to try and make their waists smaller, though this idea is debated), but it still required tightly bound whale bone corsets and layers of heavy petticoats.  Little attention was paid to the breasts; push-up and padded bras did not exist, instead the curved upper torso was created by cinching in the waist, so that while the upper body appeared fuller, it did not yet have the definition that would be seen in later decades.

The 1910s

As the century progressed, silhouettes began to transform into a leaner, straighter shape, and the corsets and bustles of the previous decades mostly disappeared. What corsets were still in use now were longer, coming down past the hips and up to just under the bust, helping to achieve a streamlined look. The waist line rose to an “empire waist”, just below the bust, and as the ankles were now often visible, the length of slips shortened. As the petticoats slimmed, bloomers were replaced with a closer fitting underwear, more similar to what we see today. It is also during this time that we see a change in the overall aesthetic of undergarments; they were truly becoming lingerie. Machine-made lace was more readily available, and so decorative underwear could be purchased for a more reasonable price. The ads of the time no longer looked like a textbook page on what was available, but began to embrace the beauty and sensuality of the products.


The 1920s saw the change from a “womanish” figure to a “girlish” one; the bust, hips and waist were slimmed to a straight, narrow, almost boyish look, and hemlines shortened dramatically. We begin to see some two-piece undergarments, but the bras still are not lifting or defining the breasts. As hemlines were shorter, decorative garters and stockings became popular. Tube-like corsets were used to help curvier women attain a straighter silhouette.


Two-piece undergarments were the norm come the 1930s and slips were less common. Curves again were being embraced, and women with round, curved hips were adored. Tight-fitting girdles were sometimes used to shape the hips, and early versions of the bras we wear today are seen. Hollywood began to have a major part in the popularity of women’s styles, and ads of the decade catered to those looking for a glamourous silhouette.


The war had a major effect on women’s fashions as many materials were rationed. “Make do and mend” was the motto, and women were encouraged to sew their own clothes and update their old ones to match the current styles. The limits on fabrics meant that a more angular, fitted look defined the decade, and hemlines were once again shorter, hitting just below the knee. Military styles were popular, and women’s suits came in fashion. Nylon was one of the casualties of the war, as it was needed to make parachutes, and so nylon stockings disappeared from the stores. In an effort to maintain the look, some women drew black “seams” up the back of their legs, giving the illusion of wearing stockings. As many women went out to work in factories, they traded in their dresses and skirts for trousers and overalls, a style that required more form-fitting underwear. Silk was also unavailable because of the war effort, and so slips were less common. To make up for the simplicity in clothing, women’s hairstyles became more elaborate, and accessories were used to decorate an outfit rather than wearing a whole new garment. While there were new styles in 1940s undergarments, keep in mind that many would not have been purchasing them, and would have likely used what they already had instead.


When the war and its rations ended, fashions embraced the new availability of fabrics, and the female silhouette returned to a fullness it had not seen since the turn of the century. Fitted tops showcased a full bust, and pointed bras lifted and accentuated the breasts. The waist was cinched with a girdle, and full skirts were ballooned with petticoats and bouffants. Stockings were again available, and new “seamless” ones were on the market. Underwear ads became increasingly sexual, and there is a noticeable turn in the marketing which now aimed itself more at men (purchasing for their wives) than women.  Most women were back in the home, and so fashion could again take place over practicality. The ideal women was one who, as Audrey sings in “Little Shop of Horrors”, “cooked like Betty Crocker and looked like Donna Reed”; feminine, fashionable and a devoted wife and mother.


While many in the 1960s still embraced full skirts, girdles and push-up bras, as feminism blossomed many in the fashion world began to lean towards more natural silhouettes and more comfortable clothing. Skirts got very short, cut high on the thigh, and so slips and underwear shortened as well. Late in the decade and into the 1970s, some women stopped wearing bras and by that point most had long abandoned the corset or girdle. When dressing the 1960s, there are several ways you can go, so before looking for undergarments, ask yourself; is your character a Glamour Puss? a Hippie? a preppy teen? There are many ways to go.

Earlier Decades:

While we here at Bygone tend to focus on the first half of the 20th Century, when it comes to underwear, earlier periods have some of the most interesting articles. Want to learn more about women’s unmentionables? Check out some of these articles:

Mental Floss – A Funny Approach

Hosiery History – Stockings Through The Years

Vintage Lingerie Ads

Elizabethan Costuming