Friends of Bygone – Aria da Capo: Rewired

1425202_714023341996008_1435630822043045471_oLast night was the opening of the original play, “Aria da Capo: Rewired”. As we won’t have a chance to see it until closing, I thought I’d do a quick write up now.

Location: Theatre Passe Muraille Backspace
Date & Time: May 15-17, 8:00pm, Saturday May 17, 2:00pm
Tickets: available here www.artsboxoffice.ca OR call: 416.504.7529. $15 general admission, $10 for arts workers.

Synopsis: Welcome to the entertainment, a fast-paced high-stakes comedic wilderness flooding your televisions, laptops, smartphones and brains, every second of every day.

Cast: Kathleen Goodleaf, Matt McGrath, Megan Poole, Jenn Sartor, Will Hofstetter
Directed by: Reg Matson
Lighting Design by: Colin Harris

45 minutes long.

 

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To Cast, With Love – Director’s Notes from “Dial M For Murder”

There’s never enough space in the tiny little programs to say all that I want to about a show, and about all the amazing people who’ve helped to make it happen. I’ve considered doing what some directors do, and making a speech at the end of closing night, but that always felt more like a selfish statement than a good time to thank everyone; no one wants to see the boring old director after seeing the awesome show, and I don’t want to keep the cast and crew from getting out and celebrating. So in an effort to say all my thank-yous, but keep our program from becoming a full length novel, I’ve decided to write here the “director’s cut” version of my notes on “Dial M For Murder”:

First off, to my fellow producer and co-founder of Bygone Theatre; Matt McGrath. Matty is my best friend and my go-to for just about everything in life. When we started this company, he was mostly interested in being involved as an actor, but as the company has grown he has stepped up and taken on some major production roles, most of which he had no prior knowledge of. Matt does everything from scraping together the funds for the show, to working on the set, to going out and putting up hundreds of posters. He essentially functions as an assistant director and I often go to him for advice on scenes or moments in the play, be it just for reassurance or for actual help should I ever find myself stuck. He is an invaluable part of this company, this production, and my life. So many thanks, and a thousand hugs and kisses go to him.

My stage manager Jayden Hsueh has not only take on the dreaded SM tasks like booking rehearsal spaces and working out scheduling issues, but he has stepped up to help with finding props and building sets as well. Jayden is always a happy, positive influence in the room, and his smile (and the cookies and doughnuts he often brings to rehearsals) helps to keep everyone’s energy up. Jayden is motivated and reliable, and I can’t wait to work on another production with him.

Alexis Budd, our fight director, is a great guy to work with. He is smart, funny, and always patient when teaching actors the choreography. He has a creative mind and is great with thinking on the spot, but is always open to suggestions from actors or myself as well. His acting experience helps him not just give tips on how to safely move and fake things like slaps, but on how to really sell it as well. If I ever find myself needing another fight director, he’ll be my first call.

Jackie McClelland is our props master and one of our set designers for this show. I was thrilled to get her, as Jackie is working with increasingly bigger companies and productions, and I worry one day she’ll go off and leave us behind! Jackie is clever and a great problem solver, and has worked out all our props issues. She has a great eye, and is a fun and positive person to work with; I hope we’ll get the chance to do another show together again soon.

Mike Bazzocchi is an amazing builder. He has a unique background that includes engineering and acting, so he not only knows the practical elements required in making a set, he knows what will look good and what the actors will need as well. He’s quick on his feet, positive, and great at explaining things to those of us with no design knowledge. I hope to be able to give him a more creative set to design one day, as I know he is capable of coming up with really original ideas as well as making something that looks like an authentic 1950s living room. He makes me laugh, and I always feel confident any task left to him will be done, and done well. Thank you for that.

My mother Karen Henderson made not just our lovely pinch pleat curtains, but all of Margot’s dresses as well, which not only saved us a lot of money (and me a lot of time), but meant that we could have authentic 1950s dresses that fit our actor perfectly. She is a life-saver as her sewing expertise means I can pick out virtually any pattern and fabric, for any actor, and leave her to do all the hard work of actually making the thing! Every time we do a show and I pile more and more costumes on, she swears it’ll be the last time, but hopefully it doesn’t actually come to that as her costumes are a big part of what makes our shows look great.

Reg Matson is our technical director (and Inspector Hubbard, but I’ll get to that), and has helped me to solve problems from how to run sound from strange spots onstage, to what should be done with the lights. Reg not only has vast theatre knowledge, he has a great artistic mind. He never tells someone what they should do, but asks them questions and helps them to figure out what it is they really want to achieve. He’s been an amazing positive influence in so many ways these past few months, and I know we’ll continue to work together in the future.

Nicole Byblow chose all the lovely period music for the show. Nicole and I first met when doing “Retro Radio Hour”, and I’m so glad to have found not just a talented performer, but a fellow Judy lover as well! Nicole has a great ear and a real understanding of the period, so she’s certainly someone I will work with again. She’s a fun and sweet person, and great at everything she does.

Janice Li is our high school production assistant, and has helped with everything from sitting in on auditions, to making the bricks for the exterior wall, to doing random tasks like coffee runs and sweeping the stage. She’s always up to any task we give her, and I think she will do well as she goes off to focus in production design. I hope she’s managed to learn someone along the way, or at the very least had some fun – we’ve certainly needed all her help!

There have been dozens of people who have helped out with things along the way, and I hope I can remember them all here, so thank you to;

My aunt, Heather Henderson, who donated all our concession items and helped to make the cast t-shirts.

My sister, Rebecca Dix, who worked on the display boards, the concessions, and running Front of House.

My father, Kevin Dix, who shuttled around props, costumes, and concessions, driving up from Waterloo to do so.

Our former producer, Tom Beattie, who donated funds, supplies, and his time to this show.

Brian and Margaret McGrath, Matt’s parents, who donated both money to the show, and allowed us to use their garage to build the set, while putting up with not just the noisy actors and the mess, but with feeding all of us as well!

Danielle Son who took lovely photos of the show.

Kyle Pearson, K. Nolan, and Chris Ross who all came to help out with the load-in.

UC Follies, who helped with both cross-promotions, and who leant us space and props for the show.

Orphaned Egret Productions
, Newborn Theatre, BeMused, and Hart House Theatre, who all helped to promote the show.

Jesse Watts, who was the first to make a donation to “Dial M For Murder”.

Noa Katz and Deb Lim who are assisting backstage.

The staff at the Robert Gill Theatre; the late Lou Massey who helped with our initial set-up, Paul Stoesser who helped in running tech week, Teo Balcu who took the lead in our lighting design, and Vanita Butrsingkorn who assisted in all sorts of backstage and technical elements during tech week.

TAPA, TO Tix, and The Robert Gill Theatre for all the help and support.

Insomnia Restaurant and Lounge for sponsoring our opening night after party.

And, last but not least, my fabulous cast.

I’m so happy to have met Leete Stetson. He is a talented actor and a wonderful friend, and I thank him for all his support and advice on and offstage. We became friends while acting together in Hart House’s “Romeo and Juliet”, and quickly discovered a mutual love of musicals, and a lot of similar tastes. While he and I may disagree on some fundamental theatre things (like bare walls versus a full set), the debates are always friendly and useful. I know I will work with him again, and can’t wait to see what amazing character he does next.

Rebekah has been a total joy to work with. Every note I give her she takes and acts on immediately; she started out as Margot looking and sounding great, but the progression I’ve seen her make through the rehearsal process has really been astounding. She’s turned what could have been a 2-dimensional, typical 1950s housewife into a complex and compelling character, and she makes these changes with such ease that it’s clear she’s one to watch out for. On top of her talent onstage, Rebekah has helped with things like hemming pants, and has offered to pick up the slack wherever it’s needed. I hope we will work together again as she is a lady of many talents, and a very sweet girl to boot.

When I first met Kenton I hoped that he would be as talented as he was sweet and charming, because after 30 seconds of talking to him you know he’s someone you want to work with. Lucky for me, he was. Kenton takes initiative not just with learning and running lines, but with running warm-ups with the group as well. He has amazing stage presence, and is a total joy to watch. A man of many talents, I know he will go far, and I just hope that before he gets too big I have another chance to work with him! All that energy he has is bound to come in handy as he is one who I think will find himself constantly working.

As an actor, Reg is thoughtful and deliberate. He has a very analytical approach to acting, and often pauses to talk through the motivations of all the characters onstage. He is clever and committed, and I love to watch him go through his process as it often brings out new and interesting moments in the show.

Jason  has been a total joy to work with, because he is a kind, thoughtful and genuine human being as well as being a talented actor. Despite having a relatively short amount of time onstage, Jason has been at nearly every rehearsal and has helped with things like being on book, or reading for someone who wasn’t there. He’s always quick to offer assistance with anything, and is always in a positive mood. He takes notes to heart, and has created in Lesgate a truly disturbing character that is so far from his real self that it is a testament to how good an actor he really is.

Despite being onstage for only about a minute in this show, Ian has shown up to all the rehearsals and stayed attentive, offering suggestions, advice and questions throughout the process. He has truly taken the “there are no small parts, only small actors” motto to heart and has created several distinct characters for his brief phone conversations. He has been helpful by being on book and keeping track of actors blocking while he’s not onstage, and has always been a positive influence in the room. And with a voice like his, there’s no doubt he’ll find himself more work in theatre, or radio!

To everyone who helped in anyway, be it by working on the show directly or just being someone to talk to when the stress levels got high, thank you. And to everyone who came out to see all our hard work, thank you – none of this could happen without you.

-Emily Dix
Artistic Director
Bygone Theatre

“Dial M For Murder” – Rehearsal Photos

We’re doing runs all week so I thought I’d nab some quick rehearsal photos – here’s the cast in their new “Dial M For Murder” t-shirts!

Remember, the show runs August 15-17 at the Robert Gill Theatre. Tickets are available through TO Tix and we highly encourage you to buy in advance!

If you like these pics, check out our facebook page for more!

The cast of "Dial M For Murder"

The cast of “Dial M For Murder”

Kenton Blythe as Max Haliday

Kenton Blythe as Max Haliday

Leete Stetson and Rebekah Manella as Tony and Margot Wendice

Leete Stetson and Rebekah Manella as Tony and Margot Wendice

Jason Manella as Captain Lesgate

Jason Manella as Captain Lesgate

Reg Matson as Inspector Hubbard

Reg Matson as Inspector Hubbard

Dial M For Murder – Actor/Crew Spotlight – Reg Matson

Reg is our technical director and also playing Inspector Hubbard in “Dial M For Murder”. He was a performer (the “announcer”) in “Retro Radio Hour”.

*anyone who knows Reg will not be surprised by this rather “unique” spotlight!

Reg Matson - Technical Director and Inspector Hubbard.

Reg Matson – Technical Director and Inspector Hubbard.

Bio:

Reg is a graduate of the Film and English programs at UofT, where he has written, directed, and performed original works. Reg is also a member of the Hart House Theatre Standing Committee, and has worked on several of the theatre’s shows operating tech.

Selected Credits: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Arcadia (Hart House Theatre), The Bear (Next Stage Theatre Company). As Writer: Mannequin Ensemble (Hart House Players), The Wormwood Prince (Next Stage Theatre Company). As Director: The Threepenny Opera (UC Follies).

*Being a writer, here is Reg’s interpretation of his bio and interview questions:

From the hilltop you could hear the coast, its star-stirred waves, pulsing under pitch. Sunless dark. The island was too distant to see, except by force of imagination. The silhouette of its stalk grew tall, towering, cursing earth, reaching past night’s canopy.

You held hands with a fir tree blanketed by the season. It shook and scattered snow, and its animation filled you with life. You would make it to the island, when the water turned. You would wait.

1. How did you get started as a performer, a technical director?

Every twist is impatience, jogging the rock, slipping the white earth into the sea. Spring melted the frost and found beneath it glittering sand, coruscant, a land eager to reflect the smiling sky. The fir was in pieces now. You cut it yourself. Equal lengths bound by its bark, its fingers, its skin. Now it would sail with you to the island.

2. What is your favourite part of the creative process?

The wind changed direction, the waves agreed. They skipped and cajoled, straying away from the coast. Did they notice your raft?– as you slipped into their wake. Did they know the fir, before it ferried you between them? Their mischief was too great, the wind’s and the wave’s. They played, and unwittingly carried you to the island.

3. What are some challenges you face as a performer, a technical director?

You landed on rocks, draped in a cloud, weighed down by the shadow of the towering stalk. The landing was rough, and your raft fell apart, so you tie its pieces in a sling and carry it on your back. Above you are branches, or giant leaves. Too high to tell. Mist clings to them, and rolls off in streams. The challenge of imagining a top is too great. You climb the rocks, and make for the base of the stalk.

4. What advice would you give to people pursuing performance, technical direction?

It hears you come, and it creaks. Its size is unfathomable. Whole forests wide, it seems. You long to know it. It has wisdom, it has life. You press against the stalk with your hand, with your head. Inside it sounds like rivers, like canyons, like stars. It has tendrils and vines that greet and curl around you. They touch the pieces of fir, and shiver, recoil. The sounds stop — what has happened? Could the fir have been its child? You gaze up and lose track. There’s a crack like thunder. It begins to fall.

5. What are you most excited for in regards to “Dial ‘M’ for Murder?”

You run for the water. The wind and waves are excited, or scared. You paddle into the current with the bundle of fir beneath your chest, and look up to see the stalk falling away, hitting the water. The force throws you far, under water, into air. The stalk is still plummeting from the sky, falling forever. You can feel the sea surging beneath you, flooding the island and the coast, filling the horizon. The spray darkens the sky.

Night passes in torrents. Come daybreak you are alone. No island, no coast — just the bundle of fir, still holding your hand. A bird circles above you, not sure where to land.