Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Crew Spotlight – Associate Producer, Tea Nguyen

Associate Producer Tea Nguyen joined the team about a month ago, coming into a project that has been steadily pumping along since October 2014. We asked her for some insights on the show and her process.

Some people would be intimidated by joining a team late. The team has already created bonds, had great moments together and they have the ball rolling. In joining the team, there was a slight moment of panic, as there is any project. Luckily, Kid Switchblade and Bygone Theatre has welcomed me onboard with open arms. As their associate producer, I work under Emily Dix. This will be my second time under her care and I must say, I’m very excited to return to New York with her to do our second New York International Fringe show. The show is dark, comical and tells a great story about two girls who have grown up under the grace of God and have gone in complete opposite directions in life. If you are squeamish or have a small stomach for gore, this isn’t the show for you. Watching these talented actors is so inspiring. We had a full day of learning stunt choreography and they gave it their all. Blood sweat and more sweat (referring to Thomas, playing Ronnie). They are eager to learn, thriving to do well and hungry to perform. I’m quite excited to see it all put together, yet enjoying the journey along the way.

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Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical – Crew Spotlight – Lyricist, David Backshell

How did you get involved in KSK?
I had been friends with Drac for a couple of years; I was a a regular in his bar and I worked in a cafe down the street from where he lived. So when I released an EP earlier this year (called Halfsleeper), I played it for him, he dug the lyrics and asked me to help out. I had a meeting with his brother and director Jamieson and brought along some lyrics surrounding some general themes (some of which eventually got used in the show’s opener ‘Fuck This City!’). He liked the direction of them and I was pretty much hired.

What’s the creative process like for the lyrics like?
Typically it starts with a production meeting where the creative crew talk about content, structure, themes, what voices we are going to hear and character arcs that should be present in the songs. I go away and overwrite and essentially create a brain dump. I bring it back to Drac and Jameison  and they talk about what they like, dislike, what fits and what elements we should play up or play down. At this point the refining process begins until we are happy with the end product. I take it to Mike (the composer) and see how it works together with the music and we tweak things until it fits.

What’s the most challenging aspect of writing the lyrics for KSK?
Probably trying to incorporate all these distinct voices into a clear narrative. Trying to make each character’s voice well rounded but balanced to serve the story without making them cliched.

As a result I feel that Dagger and Kitty both have strong personalities but act very much as catalysts to the story. The repercussions of their actions often fall upon their respective siblings who find themselves picking up the pieces.

Who is the most exciting character to write for?
Ronnie, he’s arguably the most tragic character in the musical. Certainly the one that audience will be most sympathetic too. His voice also mirrors fairly closely the kind of lyrics I naturally write. I had a great time writing Ronnie’s lament, I feel it cuts to the core of his character and you see both his naivety, idealism also his weakness. He is a man that is lost in the world.

Who has been the most difficult character to write for?
Probably Lily, as she is a very schizophrenic character. In the first act she comes across as almost a Mother Theresa type character, doing her best to help those around her. In the second act, after the attack it’s hard to know where she is coming from. She’s incredibly violent and we are left wondering whether this is some kind of PTSD reaction, or is she really doing God’s work? Balancing this Old Testament style judgement against someone who has gone through traumatic events, while keeping them human is a hard act to get right.
Check out David’s own work on his website. Want to help support our show? Visit the show page to make a donation.

AUDITIONS – Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical

Bygone Theatre is currently accepting audition submissions for our upcoming production of Kill Sister, Kill! A Musical, set to premiere at the New York City International Fringe Festival August 2015.

***MUST HAVE A VALID PASSPORT AND BE ABLE TO TRAVEL TO NYC FOR AUGUST 20 – 30TH, 2015 IN ORDER TO AUDITION***

Directed by Jamieson Child
Written by Drac Dillinger & Jamieson Child
Music by Mikey Zahorak
Produced by Emily Dix

SYNOPSIS:
A Psychotronic Hell-trip of Song, Sleaze and Revenge! A nun, doing God’s work on the filthy streets of 70s New York, reunites with her beloved sister to celebrate her wedding. Their night of revelry is despoiled by two vulgar, depraved sickos. Left for dead and robbed of her sister and her voice, the Woman of God rebuilds herself as a Weapon of Hellbent Vengeance!

CHARACTERS:
Ronnie: A young punk, eager to impress his big brother, Ronnie isn’t the brightest, the baddest, or the best with the ladies, but he has a good heart.

Dagger: Ronnie’s older brother, Dag is a violent, drug-fueled psycho who uses & abuses everyone he’s with, including his little brother.

Lily: A god-fearing nun doing her best to clean up the streets of NYC. Sheltered & a little naive, the only family she has is her sister, Kitty.

Kitty: A born wild-child, Kitty has worked in Vegas as a “dancer”. While she loves her older sister, she is the complete opposite of Lily and spends her time drinking, dancing & screwing.

NOTE: As the show is still being completed, vocal ranges can vary. We are looking for performers with great character and a strong voice who are willing to workshop the show for a couple months and develop songs that will suit their voices.

AUDITIONS:
To request an audition, please send your headshot & resume to Producer Emily Dix at emily@bygonetheatre.com, no later than Wednesday July 3, 2015. Those selected for an audition will be contacted to schedule a date and time in early June.

Set Design Inspiration – Art Deco

Recently I did a blog post on set design inspiration in a Mid Century Modern style  and referenced our production of “Dial M For Murder” that was set in the mid 1950s. As we start to get ready for our next show, Patrick Hamilton’s “Rope”, written in 1929, I’ve been thinking about another major design trend; Art Deco.

The term Art Deco refers to a visual design period that originated in France after World War One. While it was still seen into the early 1940s, the style is most commonly associated with the 1920s and 30s. It featured bold, geometric patterns, rich colours, metallics, and modern Machine Age imagery. It is associated with modern glamour and mass production (which did not have the negative connotation then that it often does today).

Now for a recap – when starting to research a period’s design aesthetic, I start by looking at the following three elements:

  1. Silhouette: What sort of general styles and silhouettes were common, and where can we find those in both vintage and modern pieces?
  2. Colour: What colours were popular at the time? And in particular, what colour schemes would have been used then that are rarely used today?
  3. Accents: Are there any accent pieces (lamps, phones, statues, vases etc.) that are frequently associated with the decade?

They always say there are three things everyone wants when putting together a show; for it to be good, fast and cheap. The catch, of course, is that you can only ever have two of the three. For most of us in the theatre world, “cheap” is a necessity, and personally I always want “good” as well, which means I have to put a lot of time into researching and sourcing materials. If you want to have a great looking set, start early. Very early. And take your time looking around not only vintage stores (they can be pricey) but thrift stores, garage sales, and hell, even checking out what people throw out on garbage day. You know what they say, “one man’s trash…”.

Time to start the research bit:

Art Deco Palette: 1920s and 30s Colours:

Colour schemes of the Jazz Age were anything but subtle; while many pastels and secondary colours were in use they were often used as a background against bold, contrasting pieces. Sherwin Williams has a great section on authentic period colours that you can check out for some specifics. Purples and blues were very popular, as were accents of red or orange. Black trim alongside a tropical colour like peacock blue or a bright mint green was common.

Possibly more important than the colours were the patterns used on anything from walls to curtains to furniture. Intricate geometric patterns, often featuring shell or fan shapes adorned often multiple pieces in a Art Deco room. Tiled floors in black and white were also a common feature.

 

Of course, not all homes of the 1920s and 30s were complete examples of the Art Deco style, however, many had some features that can be associated with the look; in the photos below, you can see examples of minimal Art Deco features (like the tile work in the kitchen floors or on the bathroom wall) alongside rooms that are the epitome of the look (like the gorgeous bedroom and the circular interior entryway).

Art Deco Silhouette: 1920s and 30s Furniture

Art Deco furniture is about glamour and bold statements; each piece is like a work of art. Complex geometric designs alongside beautiful organic curves created a look of extravagance. Often different types of wood were mixed within one piece, creating interesting patterns and design, and mirrored furniture and metallics were all the rage.

Art Deco Vibe: 1920s and 30s Accent Pieces

Bronze sculptures are a staple of the Art Deco look. Gorgeous women (often either naked or wearing a flapper-style outfit) sometimes held a light, or simple stood there as a beautiful accent. Greyhounds were the “it” dog, and are often seen on anything from lamps to ashtrays.  Panthers were also a common sculptural subject. The lamps of the period were more about artistic beauty than practically shining light in the room.

Bygone’s Art Deco – How to Fake The Look Today

As we prepare for “Rope” I have started a pinterest board collecting some of my favourite examples of Art Deco; you can see it here, and I will update this once our set design begins.

For those of you trying to do this look before then, here are some tips on how to fake it and do it on the cheap:

Painting a Art Deco design on a simple tray

Painting a Art Deco design on a simple tray

 

Art Deco Tray: The simplest and easiest way to create a Deco piece is with paint. If you’re new to stenciling, try starting with something small, like a tray, and if that is successful you can move on to a larger piece like a dresser. HGTV has a great tutorial here to get you started.

 

artdeco

Moldings create architectural detail.

Art Deco Molding: If you’re doing a show with flats, try adding some architectural detail above doorways or windows. This can be done with wood or even cardboard. For a great tutorial on this look (one meant for the home, remember, cheaper materials could be used onstage), check out The Joy Of Moldings.

 

1980s Finds: Finally, as always, when setting a stage on the cheap, your local thrift shop is your best friend. The 1980s saw a revival of Art Deco style and so you may be able to come across some pieces on the cheap. Look for things with the right “bones” – changing the colour of a dresser or adding a throw pillow on a sofa is easy, but you don’t want to take on anything that doesn’t have your desired silhouette. If you don’t have a lot of money for set pieces, but want to make an impact, stenciling designs on the flats may be a good way to go.

Again, not everyone in the 1920s or 30’s had art Art Deco home – country styles were common in the 1920s, and during the Great Depression of course, homes were rarely decorated with anything new. So before you start to collect deco pieces for your set, make sure that it fits the show – this style is associated with the upper class, new money, “modern young things”. A great look but not for everyone.

-E.

 

 

How to Dress the 1920’s – Affordable Modern Day Alternatives to Authentic 20’s Women’s Fashion

We’ve all had that disappointing moment, when, in dressing a period show, we realize how difficult and more so, how expensive authentic period fashion can be.
While one of Bygone’s mandates is to keep our costumes as authentic as possible, in some of my other productions I’ve had to bend the rules and work with modern clothing that mimics the shape and style of period pieces.

In this blog mini-series, I will demonstrate some simple methods for achieving period-esq looks on a budget. If you’ve got some tips of your own, feel free to share them in the comments!

The 1920s Silhouette
Chances are, when most people think of the 1920s, the first image to come to mind is that of the “flapper”. A drop-waist, lots of fringe, knee-length skirt and swinging beads. While this look works for “party girl” characters, or those in a musical, it is not the style that was worn by the majority of women. Still, it is a great stepping stone for a basic women’s silhouette. Let’s examine some basic silhouettes here:

Fig. 1 – Here is a 1920 silhouette from the Fashion-Era website. Early in the decade styles were still fairly conservative. Hemlines reached below mid-calf, exposing no more than the ankles, and empire-waists were still common. Sheath-style, tube-like dresses that gave the women a androgynous look were popular and floppy hats, low on the brow, were often worn (see my blog on hats for more details).

Fig. 2 – Another silhouette courtesy of Fashion-Era , this time from 1922. Note the drop-waist. Flowing, light-weight fabric in the skirt.

Fig. 3 – By the middle of the decade, hemlines were shorter now reaching mid-calf (but still always covering the knee). The drop waist was still fashionable, and the skirts were still often made of flowing fabric.

Fig. 4 – Not an authentic silhouette, but one immediately recognizable as being from the decade. Now the hair is cut short, rather than pinned up, in a style associated with Louise Brooks. Still a drop-waist. Here the skirt seems to be made of fringe or even feathers. The hemline is higher than what would have likely been seen (the knees were rarely revealed).

1920s Colours

The Roaring Twenties saw a wide range of colour in fashion. While only a few decades earlier, most women were wearing dark, dreary colours, the 20’s featured clothing from pastels to bold primary colours. Gowns were generally monochromatic, layering colour-on-colour details and relying on beading or embroidery for variation, rather than mixing colours. This helped to create the long, lean look that was the signature style of the decade.

Fig. 5 – Bold, dark colours for the winter months. Note how the dress itself is nearly entirely one colour – at the very least, monochromatic. A contrasting hat was sometimes worn, and most shoes were black leather.

Fig. 6 – Salmon colours, emerald, and lots of blue. Again, mostly monochromatic although note the high-contrast in the yellow and black gown, and the mixing of natural fur with a bright pastel.

Fig. 7 – More pastel colours for the summer months, and again, blue! Shoes for summer frocks were often of lighter, brighter colours that matched the dress. While there is a lot of detail on the gowns, they continue to be primarily monochromatic.

Fig. 8 – Mixing various shades of the same colour for some visual interest, but still keeping the look monochromatic.

Fig. 9 – Bold, Art Deco inspired styles. Black and white high-contrast gowns with accents in red or pink give a startling, stylized look.

Again, nearly any colour could be used for the 1920s, just remember to avoid any complimentary colours within one outfit for a more authentic look. For additional info, The Vintage Traveler blog has a great post on dating vintage fashion with colour.

1920s Fabrics

A variety of fabrics were available in the 1920s. The majority of things that we purchase today were available then, with the main exception being “stretchy” fabrics (no Lycra in the 20s!). While daily wear was likely simple cotton dresses, I will briefly go over some fabrics that those who do not sew may not be as familiar with:

Chiffon: Made from cotton, silk or synthetic fibers, this sheer, light-weight fabric is woven in a way that puckers the fabric slightly, giving it some stretch and a rough feel. Available in a wide variety of colours it is most common in evening wear and can give an elegant, floating appearance.

Satin: A light-weight, flowing fabric with a glossy front and dull back, satin is another popular formal wear choice. Often associated with nightgowns, this fabric hangs loose and looks stunning when draped. Also available in many colours.

Taffeta: Generally more expensive than the previous two listed, it is a crisp, smooth fabric with a bit of a sheen. Stiff and able to hold some shape, taffeta can be used to create things from corsets, to gowns that maintain a consistent shape. Many colours, but generally less variety (at least in local fabric stores) than the other two, likely due to the cost.

Velvet: A thick, woven, tufted fabric, generally made in deep, dark colours. Smooth and soft, the fabric is associated with nobility and high status, and so the high price tag shouldn’t be a surprise.

I won’t go into too much detail for these, as it is not my area of expertise. However, for a great resource on what fabrics to use, and how to combine them, check out this site.

How-To: 1920s Style in Modern Day Fashion

So what to do with this information now? Certainly those with the budget can source out authentic patterns (Vintage Vogue has a few) and buy expensive fabrics, but when working in community theatre this is rarely an option. To give you an idea of some affordable, modern day pieces that can be used to imitate 1920s fashion, check out my design boards below:

1920s Style from 2014 H&M Dresses

1920s Style from 2014 H&M Dresses

A great resource for affordable dresses is H&M. While the styles you will find here will generally be too short or two revealing to be a really authentic 20s look, there are some dresses that can be a good starting place. Whether you buy a gown that already has a waist, or go for a more loose-fit, flowing style, give the dress a 20s flair by adding an exaggerated drop-waist. A simple way to do this (especially for non-sewers) is to add a sash (remembering to keep it monochromatic!) out of something like satin, tied low on the hips. For those with more sewing knowledge, sleeves could be fashioned out of chiffon or additional beading could be added. Throw on some retro pumps, a few strands of long beaded necklaces, and crop the hair (whether by pinning it up, or cutting it) and you will quickly and cheaply achieve a 20s look.

Sourcing 1980s & 90s Fashion for a 1920s Look

Sourcing 1980s & 90s Fashion for a 1920s Look

The community theatre costumer’s best friend is of course, the thrift shop. When trying to create a 1920s look, I generally go for 1980s and 90s fashions. As you can see in the board above, many of the styles of those decades incorporated the drop-waist, as well as large collars, lengthy sleeves, and an overall loose look. You can find these types of dresses in your local value village, or, if you happen to have some old patterns lying around, can make them and tailor them as required.

Finally, online resources like ebay and etsy often have real vintage, or vintage styled clothing. They are worth a look, at least for inspiration, if not to actually purchase the garments. Costume and party stores will often have flapper costumes, but these are generally very stylized and won’t do if you’re trying for a serious period piece. However, the cost is sometimes low, so I keep these in mind for things like dance numbers that require a lot of performers. When trying to do a cheap flapper look, simply create a headband with a feather accent, wear it low on the brow, include a sleeveless, straight-fitting tank top and a low-riding skirt, preferably out of fringe or something that moves. Throw on some cheap plastic beads and voila! Not a look I often need for my shows, but it does in a pinch.

So there you have it! A brief how-to on 1920s women’s fashion for theatre. There are tons of great resources out there, and to be honest, I usually start with a simple google search for my inspiration. Do you have any great 1920s resources? Share them here in the comments, or on our facebook page!

All for now,

E.