Cast Spotlight: Kevin Forster

Kevin Forster Bygone Theatre Loot

Kevin Forster plays Hal in our upcoming production of Loot; this is Kevin’s first production with Bygone Theatre.

Bio: Kevin is a graduate of the Ryerson Theatre School and is thrilled to be working with such an amazing team on this wacky and wonderful show! 

Selected Theatre: Leaf Coneybear in The 25th Annual Putnam county Spelling Bee and Marshall/Al in Seven Stories (Hart House Theatre), Peter in The Diary of Anne Frank (FSWC), Joe in Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story, Bjorn in Always Abba, and Flotsam in The Little Mermaid (The Lower Ossington Theatre), Jay in New Order (NovelSidwalk), Goneril in Cinderella, and Dopey in Balm In Gilead (Ryerson Theatre School), Clown in Bust-ed (Toronto Festival of Clowns).
Television/Film: Well Spent, Fear Thy Neighbor, God Hates A Coward, A Midsummer Nights Dream

What made you want to be a part of Loot?

Loot is a really funny script with so much potential when it is put on stage. I am a big fan of physical comedy, and this script is filled with opportunity to explore that.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

I really enjoy playing Hal. It is an interesting balance finding the humor in the scenario while keeping the truth and integrity of who he is. Also, we both love to frequent brothels, so that helps.

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

My favourite part of rehearsal is playing with the other actors. Every time we run through a scene, new things are discovered. Everyone is willing to allow things to evolve and explore. It may not be right, but we won’t know until we go there.

What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?

Non dairy creamer

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

Recently was in a production of “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” I am also in a folk rock band called “People Walking By” We play all the time so check us out! @people.walking.by

Why should people come out and see the show?

It’s a show with British accents, money, and death. What could be better? Certainly beats sitting at home swiping through dating profiles. Unless those profiles include British accents, money, and death. Then you’ve got a hard decision to make.

Anything else you want us to know?

The dot on top of the letter ‘i’ and ‘j’ is known as a tittle.

You can see Kevin onstage March 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre.
Get your tickets today!

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Cast Spotlight: Scott McCulloch

Scott McCulloch Bygone Theatre Loot

Scott McCulloch plays Truscott – a council employee from the Metropolitan Water Board, and certainly not a police Inspector – in our upcoming production of Joe Orton’s Loot.

Bio: Loot marks the first time in a career spanning more than 30 years, well over 100 plays and close to 50 film and television productions. that he has appeared A) with Bygone Theatre B) at the Alumnae, and C) (fulfilling a long-time ambition) in one of Mr. Orton’s plays. He is delighted on all counts. Scott has been exceptionally busy doing indie theatre over the last two years, with his work including productions of Three Sisters (Wolf Manor Theatre Collective), Titus Andronicus and Edward Albee’s The Play About The Baby (Seven Siblings), Den of Thieves (which he directed for Triple Bypass Productions) Hogtown (the largest collective in Toronto theatre history) at Campbell House, and The Trial of Judith K for Thought For Food at the TPM Backspace for which he received a Broadway World: Toronto nomination for best performance by a male in a featured role. Dad in The Dreamer Examines His Pillow (JR Theatre), Richard in Time Stands Still (Leroy Street Theatre) and Dr. Black in the dora award winning The Belle of Winnipeg (Keystone Theatre) are just a few of his other favourite stage roles. Favourite experiences in front of the camera include the films “Blood Empires”, “Phone Company Man”, “The Lady of Names”, and episodes of “My Babysitter’s a Vampire”, “Mayday”, “Aaron Stone”, and “Relic Hunter.” Watch for Scott on the festival circuit in the short films, “Fowl Play” and “Split.” He holds a BFA from the University of Windsor, and an MFA from Northern Illinois University.

What made you want to be a part of Loot?

I’ve always wanted to do one of Orton’s plays, so I was all over it as soon as I saw the audition notice.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

Truscott’s probably not the most admirable of human beings, but I love playing him. The longer I work on the role, the more I find I do have in common with him, to a greater or lesser degree, but the first thing that jumped out at me was the need to be the smartest person in the room. I’ve been trying to work on that in my personal life, but as Truscott, I can give it free reign. And of course there’s the whole wearing of women’s underclothes thing. There’s no actual mention of that in the script, but I’m pretty sure he does.

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

My favourite part of the rehearsal process so far has been just getting to play in the Orton sandbox with such a talented group of playmates.

What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?

My favourite thing to come out of the 60’s? Well, I’m dating myself here, I suppose, but . . . me. And the Rolling Stones.

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

A web series project (which co-stars Luba Goy) that I’m involved with is being pitched to potential investors in March in NYC, so I’d love it if people could give our FB page a like: www.facebook.com/savecaptjakes/ Several episodes are already available for viewing there too. I also have several short films in the can which should be popping up at various festivals before too long: 45, Fowl Play, Split, and Roadmarks. And a feature I did a few years back, Blood Empires, is still widely available online.

Why should people come out and see the show?

Orton was ahead of his time, but sadly he didn’t live long enough to write more than a handful of plays and they don’t get done nearly enough. Here’s a rare opportunity to see one of his best, performed by a crackerjack cast. Did I mention it’s hilarious?

Anything else you want us to know?
Diet Coke is even worse for you than regular Coke.
[DIRECTOR’S NOTE: I feel this may be directed specifically at me, but I choose to ignore it!]

See Scott onstage March 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre in Toronto. Get your tickets now!

Relaxed Performance of Joe Orton’s “Loot”

Loot Collective Bygone Theatre Toronto
As an effort to improve our inclusivity and accessibility, this season will mark our first Relaxed Performance. We have partnered with the Loot Collective to help support their production of Joe Orton’s Loot, which runs from March 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St. in Toronto. In order to provide an opportunity for all to enjoy the show, we as a group have decided to make the Tuesday March 13th, 8:00pm performance a Relaxed one.

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AUDITIONS – Bygone Theatre Presents “Loot” by Joe Orton

Loot Collective Bygone Theatre Toronto

It’s that time again! Bygone Theatre is holding auditions for its upcoming production of LOOT – here’s everything you need to know;

THE SHOW
WHAT: 
Loot, by Joe Orton, directed by Emily Dix
WHEN:  March 8-17th, 2018 (11 performances)
WHERE: Alumnae Theatre mainstage
SYNOPSIS: Only hours before her intended burial, the late Mrs. McLeavy is removed from her coffin by her son, Hal, and his best pal, Dennis, who have together just robbed a bank and need the coffin to stash the loot. Absurdity abounds in the dark, 1965 farce that examines attitudes surrounding death, police integrity, and the Catholic church.

This production is non-union, profit-share, and eligible for the Dora Awards.

CHARACTERS
All characters require the use of a British accent and excellent comedic timing.

HAL – early 20s, British, gay, the son of the recently deceased, full of Catholic guilt

DENNIS – early 20s, British, a sexual deviant & an undertaker

FAY – mid to late 20s, British, a nurse, says she’s a devout Catholic, uses her sexuality to manipulate men

MR. MCLEAVY – middle aged, British, a recent widower, old-fashioned, a devout Catholic, concerned about his son

INSPECTOR TRUSCOTT – middle aged, British, the bumbling police detective, not above bribery and violence, embodies every negative stereotype of the police force

MEADOWS – 20s-30s, a police officer (minor role)

AUDITIONS
WHAT TO DO: 
Email director Emily Dix (emily@bygonetheatre.com) with your headshot and artistic resume, and the subject line “Loot Auditions” to request an audition
WHEN: Auditions will be held on Friday December 8th and Saturday December 9th; callbacks TBA.
WHERE: Audition location will be sent to those selected for an audition

REHEARSALS
Will take place in January and February on evenings and weekends. Expect a total of 80 rehearsal hours before getting into the venue (exact schedule is made up after casting to accommodate as many people as possible).

His Girl Friday – Tickets Now On Sale

Tickets are now on sale for our upcoming production of His Girl Friday!

The show runs March 2-5, 2017 at the Aki Studio, Daniel’s Spectrum (the new Native Earth facility). Tickets are available for purchase online or in the Aki Studio box office; follow this link for more details, or to make your purchase.

Bygone Theatre Holiday Auction

Bygone Theatre’s Holiday Auction is just around the corner! We’ve got something for everyone, with some bids starting as low as $5. Wide range of items including theatre tickets to shows produced by Buddies in Bad Times, Scarborough Music Theatre, Hart House Theatre, Crow’s Theatre and Mysteriously Yours Dinner Theatre; vintage items from Tucked Away Antiques like signed photos of classic Hollywood stars and vintage movie posters; charming themed gift baskets; getaway packages to New York, Tuscany and Sonoma, and much more!

Proceeds go towards our upcoming production of His Girl Friday, running March 2-5, 2017. This is a big show with a big cast – 18 actors! – and so we have a lot of work to do. Help support local theatre while doing  your Christmas shopping from the comfort of your own home! Auction runs online from 9:00am Thursday December 8th to 2pm on Saturday December 10th – bid at bygonetheatre2016.eflea.ca.

 

AUDITIONS – His Girl Friday

Bygone Theatre is holding auditions for its March production of HIS GIRL FRIDAY, running March 2-5, 2017. Directed by Emily Dix.

This is a non-union, profit-share production.

HIS GIRL FRIDAY
Screenplay by Charles Lederer
Based on the play “The Front Page” by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur
Adapted for the stage & additional dialogue by Craig Dix

VENUE
Aki Studio, Daniel Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E., Toronto
Wheelchair Accessible | General Admission

SYNOPSIS
This iconic screwball comedy tells the tale of Walter Burns, a hard-boiled newspaper editor who learns that his ex-wife, “newspaper man” Hildy Johnson, is going to give-up reporting to marry a bland insurance salesman from Albany. Determined to sabotage these plans and keep Hildy with the paper (and himself), Burns convinces her to cover one last story; the execution of cop-killer Earl Williams. Things quickly spiral out of control and Burns and Hildy find themselves tangled up in the case, and each other’s lives. A hilarious look at the struggle to balance life and love.

AUDITIONS
Bygone Theatre is holding auditions December 2 & 4, 2016. To request an audition slot, please send your headshot and artistic resume to director Emily Dix (emily@bygonetheatre). Those selected for an audition will be given a chance to sign up for a slot. Please note that this is a non-union, profit-share performance.

CHARACTERS
We are casting for the following characters; please note, we encourage submissions from actors of diverse cultures and backgrounds. Some smaller roles may be doubled, as indicated.

Hildy Johnson: female, age 27 – 35
Walter Burns: male, age 30 – 37
Bruce Baldwin: male, age 27 – 35
Maisie/Jeanie: female, age 20 – 25
Diamond Louie: male, age 25 – 40
Duffy/Dr. Eglehoffer: male, age 35 – 60
Pete Davis/Doctor/Deputy: male, age 30 – 60
Murphy: male, aged 25 – 40
Bensinger: male, aged 25 – 40
Endicott: male, aged 25 – 40
McCue: male, age 25 – 40
Warden Cooley /Lieutenant/Policeman: male, aged 25 – 40
Earl Williams: male, age 35 -60
Mollie Malloy: female, age 20 – 30
Sheriff Hartwell: male, age 35 – 60
Mayor: male, age 35 – 60
Joe Pettibone: male, age 35-60
Gertrude Baldwin: female, age 25 – 35

Please visit the show page on our website to download a copy of the script.

Kill Sister, Kill! Crew Spotlight – Producer Emily Dix

How did you first get involved with KSK?

I met Jamieson Child back in late summer/early fall of 2014, when he auditioned for Rope. We hit it off in rehearsals right away, and at some point KSK came up in conversation. I remembered hearing about it when it was in Fringe a few years ago, and as I was looking for something to take to the NYC Fringe in the summer of 2015, I wanted to learn more. He had me read the script in October and I knew right away I wanted to help expand the show and bring it to New York.

What drew you to the project?

A few things. For one, it fit with Bygone’s style & mandate; a period piece, kinda dark & funny, and it was very closely tied to film as it’s inspired by vintage exploitation cinema. As well, I LOVE musicals, and really wanted to be involved in one again. Then of course there is my twisted love of cult & exploitation cinema, and I was excited by the fact that there were these 2 talented & crazy brothers who were just as into that stuff as I was, and who had taken that passion for the genre and put it towards building a really unique play. We hit it off early on and I thought we all had great complimentary skills. It just seemed like a good fit all around.

Describe your work as dramaturg, what does that entail?

It’s basically a fancy word for saying that I have to be aware of every creative aspect of the show, and that I am there sort of over-seeing the creative process. I met with Jamie & Drac a lot in the early stages and we worked out script stuff, expanding the story, breaking down beats, talking about music styles etc. Then, as we got into producing, I had to have a knowledge of the inspiration for the show to make sure that it was coming across in the marketing & overall production; being aware of the time period, the filmic references, all of that. Now, in the rehearsal stage, it’s being there to help support J with providing extra info for the actors. Being able to give period references to help fill out some gaps, to give them a strong background so they have something to build their characters off of. It’s about as broad and all encompassing as producing is, but for the other side of things.

What do you do as producer?

Everything. There are roles that are specifically mine, but at the end of the day the number one thing is making sure that everyone else is doing their job too, and stepping in to do it myself if they aren’t. As for my regular stuff? I’ve written up contracts, coordinated with the Fringe and the venue, assisted in casting & hiring, written up budgets, organized fundraisers & funding campaigns, made some posters, designed a website, worked on promoting, scheduled production meetings – you name it, I’ve done some part of it. And then I’m stage managing as well, so there’s some cross over. With that I get to be in rehearsals working closely with J the director and the cast. Really all the roles I’ve taken on just require a lot of overseeing and organizing, so while it’s an INSANE amount of stuff to get done, it actually gets a bit simpler the more I take on, because there is a lot of overlap.

What are some challenges that you’ve had to overcome?

When you’re working with artists there’s always a lot of passion & energy brought to every conversation, which is almost always good. It can make for some loud fights and big clashes though, now and then. Plus, this is a big show for a lot of us. Taking something out of city adds so many additional challenges (and costs) that it makes for a lot more stress than a usual show, and that can put a strain on relationships. I’m used to being the one directing Bygone shows as well, and so it’s a new process having to step back from that while still managing all the other stuff – not bad, but very different.

What has been your favourite part of the process so far?

Working with incredible people. I know, it sounds like a cheesy answer but it’s really true. I knew very early on that Jamieson was someone I wanted to keep working with, and he’s been a great co-worker & friend, so that’s been great. And everyone we have brought on along the way has not only been really talented but a lot of fun too. While some have gotten tense, a lot of production meetings have been filled with laughs and good times, and I’m sure as everything falls into place we’ll see more of that. I’ve always said of any show I’ve directed that I think what’s made it is having a great cast, not just in regards to talent but personality too, and I’m very happy that the same result has happened here.

Any good rehearsal anecdotes to share?

When you spend a lot of time around a small group of people, you naturally begin to let your guard down, and when you’re an artist that usually means you start to get a little weird… I couldn’t tell you how exactly it started, but for the longest time our 2nd act opening number was called “The Timbit Song” (now “Fear City”). It came about somehow when we were discussing the potential issues of a Canadian show in a US venue, and I know that we had the music down but not the lyrics. Jamieson started improvising about what the character Ronnie could sing and (brilliantly) came up with “What’s a timbit? I want a timbit! Have a timbit, what’s a fucking timbit?” and for whatever ridiculous reason that stuck so long that we now have many very formal, serious looking correspondence talking about the “Timbit Song”.

Why should people come and see the show?

This really is a unique production. The show itself is unlike any other musical I’ve seen, and it’s a lot of fun to watch. We’ve got a really talented cast & crew of young Canadian artists, and our band is made up of some very experienced (Broadway-level) NYC musicians.

How can people help support the project?

If you’re in NYC August 26th-30th, come see the show! Tickets can be purchased online. And if you can’t make it out to see it live, you can still help support the show by making a donation – every little bit helps!

Retro Radio Hour – Spring Fling!

On Thursday May 14, 2015, Bygone will be presenting the 5th show in the retro radio series, Retro Radio Hour – Spring Fling. We are back at the SoCap and as always, tickets are only $5 cash at the door. This week’s show features; Emily Dix, Matt McGrath, Elizabeth Rose Morriss, Ian McGarrett, Mikey Zahorak, Peter Grant Mackechnie, Nicole Byblow, Astrid Atherly and Joseph Vita with magic by Leigh Beadon.