Bygone Theatre Rentals – Office Furniture

We recently did a production of His Girl Friday, which meant acquiring a LARGE volume of vintage office furniture and supplies; here’s some of the furniture pieces we now have available to rent.

 

  1. Vintage Wood Office Chairs: see individual pictures for details
    Rental Price: $20.00 each/wk
  2. Burgundy Faux Leather Executive Chair: see individual picture for details
    Rental Price: $30.00/wk
  3. Small Telephone Desk: see individual picture for details
    Rental Price: $15.00/wk
  4. Wood Arts & Crafts and Mid Century Modern Desks: see individual pictures for details
    Rental Price: $40.00 each/wk
  5. Metal Cabinet: see individual picture for details
    Rental Price: $15.00/wk

The styles we have available would be suitable for someone looking for something from the 1920s-60s, or something modern day with a vintage twist. Discounts available when renting multiple pieces at once, prices listed are for a single item, before HST.

Stay tuned to see some of the smaller set dressing items we have as well.

Bygone Theatre Rentals – Appliances

Bygone Theatre has finally gotten our  storage space sorted, which means we are ready to start renting out some of our great vintage pieces! Take a look at some of our larger items here; all prices listed are before HST. Please note that we are able to negotiate payment structures, and that discounts are available when renting multiple items at once. Email us at info@bygonetheatre.com with any questions, or to place an order; we require a minimum of 3 days notice for all prop rentals.

  1. Vintage Fridge: used in Wait Until Dark, gorgeous late 50s/early 60s white fridge with dusty rose interior. Inside latch has been modified to make for easier opening. Rental Price: $75.00/wk

2. Vintage Stove: used in Wait Until Dark, charming late 1940s white stove with oven.
Rental Price: $75.00/wk

3. Vintage 1950s Ringer Washer: used in Wait Until Dark, white General Electric washing machine with wringer, mid-50s, excellent condition.
Rental Price: $75.00/wk

Bygone Theatre - 1950s Wringer Washer Rental

4. Vintage 1950s Red Mini Fridge: Late 1940s/1950s, bright red mini fridge with chrome handle. Great for a photoshoot, or for a cafe/soda shop look.
Rental Price: $75/week

Bygone Theatre Red Mini Fridge

Stay tuned for much more, including vintage office supplies, props & costumes.

Crew Spotlight – Fight Director Siobhan Richardson

Siobhan Richardson is the Fight Director for Wait Until Dark.

BIO: Siobhan Richardson is a fight director and actor/fighter/singer/dancer. Fight Direction credits includeThe Trial of Judith K (Thought For Food Productions), A Christmas Story and The Hobbit (The Grand Theatre, London), White Biting Dog (Soulpepper), Such Creatures (Nightswimming and Theatre Passe Muraille), Death of a Chief (Native Earth), James and the Giant Peach and To Kill a Mockingbird (Young Peoples’ Theatre) and Frankenstein’s Boy (Eldritch Theatre). She has taught stage combat across Canada and Europe, including London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Munich, Brittany, Norway, Finland, Estonia, and Sweden, and will be teaching at the upcoming World Stage Combat Conference. Acting credits include And Then The Lights Went Out (Stage West, Calgary), Mo and Jess Kill Susie (Harley Dog Productions), and Hogtown. For further acting credits, please go to www.SiobhanRichardson.com/actor. When not pursuing her performance career, she and her partner run Burning Mountain, dedicated to the growth and development of stage combat for the art form and for the artists.

Check out the upcoming workshop on Intimacy For The Stage:  www.BurningMountain.ca/connect/StageIntimacy

Cast Spotlight – Andrew Lorimer

Andrew Lorimer plays photographer & ex-marine Sam Hendricks in Wait Until Dark 
1. Tell us a bit about yourself, what do you do when you’re not rehearsing for Wait Until Dark?
-WUD is my first real experience being on stage in this city. About three years ago I decided to leave home (Sault Ste. Marie) and begin seriously training for this career. I could go on and on about the events that led to this decision or why I eventually went to theatre school (wait, why did I do that?) but I’ll spare you that topic for now.
When I’m not rehearsing for the show, I watch a lot of baseball. No, I’m not a Blue Jays fan….and we’ll just leave it at that. I also watch Netflix, listen to podcasts, fantasize about owning a dog, read, and cook (I am half Italian you know, so it’s in the blood).
2. How did you hear about the show? What made you want to get involved?
-I heard about this show through social media and knew I had to get involved once I read the script. To me, this script has the feeling of a Hitchcock film. When you combine that with the 1960s New York setting, it’s too good to pass up.
I am also a huge Bruce Springsteen fan (I’ve been to almost 15 of his concerts) and the text mentions the city of Asbury Park, NJ several times. This city is essentially a place of worship for his fans (his very first album is “Greetings From Asbury Park”). The playwright could have picked any city in Jersey and chose Asbury Park. It was a sign for me to audition.
3. What has been your favourite moment in rehearsal so far?
-A few weeks ago we held a “Retro Radio Hour” fundraiser. The actors in the show (including myself) had a chance to read radio plays from the 50’s in front of an audience. What can be greater than that?! Oh, right. Add in the fact that these actors were doing this at a bar.
4. How do you prepare for playing a role like Sam? Have you done a similar role in the past?
-I’ve always felt a connection to the city of New York, especially during the 1960s. A large amount of the art I absorb has some connection to that city and time. In theatre school, we performed a children’s show set in both. It’s one of the most wonderful memories I have from that point in my life. I remember listening to ALOT of Hendrix, Motown, etc during that time to capture the “spirit of the 60s”.
5. Why should everyone come see the show?
-Like I said earlier, if you like the tension of Hitchcock’s films you’ll love this production.
6. Anything else you want to add?
– Next up for me is “Love’s Labour’s Lost” (Bard in the Park) followed by “Hairspray” (YES Theatre).
I wouldn’t be here today without the support, mentorship and love from the following people that I would like to thank (since this is my first show in Toronto): Theatre SMC, Jack W, Anna M, Mom/Dad, the 6CP and, most of all, Kelsey.
Catch Andrew onstage April 14-16th at Tarragon Theatre. Tickets selling fast, buy yours today at waituntildarkto.bpt.me.

Cast Spotlight: Dave Walpole

Dave Walpole plays the thick-headed con man, Carlino, in Wait Until Dark.

1. Tell us a bit about yourself, what do you do when you’re not rehearsing for Wait Until Dark?

I’m a commuter. Coming from Hamilton, Ontario, and outside of rehearsing for Wait Until Dark, I am a host on several Youtube shows called on Informoverload, FTD Facts and my own show called The Ivy Show, really funny check it out. I come to work in Toronto every day. I work in the industry, and act. I’m spending time at the gym prepping for a role with Livingston Studios for a film called The Weekend. Other then that I’m a humble dude, waiting for my brother to return from teaching English in China in order to party. Outside of this industry I write working on two screen plays. And besides working kicking back and playing a good online xbox game is always fun.

2. How did you hear about the show? What made you want to get involved?

I heard about the show through a casting website called Mandy. I wanted to do this because I’m a fan of the film, and my mom once told me she saw a play version of it and it scared her to death, even after seeing the film. So I just wanted to be apart of that same magic my mom experienced. And I like the classical stuff, or retro what ever we would call a play form the 60’s. Always had a desire to do Pirates of Penzance, HMS Pinafore, or Shot in the Dark.

3. What has been your most rewarding moment in rehearsal so far?

My most rewarding part of rehearsing has been playing a character I didn’t initially see myself playing, but that’s the industry and you work with it. Carlino is a fun character, and getting into the way he thinks is fun. I’m enjoying my cast they are all really talented and cool people. And seeing Abby who is playing Gloria throwing pans around the rehearsal set. Also hearing Shannon say “Mike, Sam, Gloria” is hilarious. But over all love working with Emily, she’s a good director that is very constructive and gives great suggestions and actions to expand our scene work.

4. How do you prepare for playing a role like Carlino?

How do I prepare for Carlino. Well first know your lines, but don’t just know them study them. It is a big challenge with the amount of work I am doing at the same time of prepping for this play. But when it comes to studying lines I ask myself, “why do I, as Carlino, basically do and say what I say, how do I feel, why do I walk over in this direction?” You have to think a bit about that to understand the character and then feel the character. Carlino is an interesting character as in he’s a bit childish, with muscle. He’s impulsive and not to bright. He uses his words to keep people way from him ever having to use his brass knuckles cause the truth is he’s never used them. He’s lying to himself and I love it, because Carlino has to believe his own lies.

5. Why should everyone come see the show?

Well first of all it’s a classic or like I said Retro. Great time out. Bygone is fun indie theatre, where it’s a little more intimate, and down to earth then your bigger productions. The cast is fantastic, and the story is great. The ending is one that you will definitely remember. We have some amazing actors, and even some great young talent.

6. Anything else you want to add?

Follow me on my Youtube channel and tune in to the Ivy show. It’s a show that features me and a foul mouth long haired Chihuahua named Ivy.

Catch Dave onstage from April 14-16th in the rehearsal hall of Tarragon Theatre. Tickets available online.

Cast Spotlight: Abby Strachan

1.Tell us a bit about yourself, what do you do when you’re not rehearsing for Wait Until Dark?

I recently turned fifteen and am in grade nine. At my high school I major in Drama as well as taking Advanced Placement courses in order to challenge myself academically. I love to read and write poems and stories. I’ve been dancing since I was 4 and that’s when I really found my love of performing. I’ve also been teaching dance to younger dancers since I was twelve and I love babysitting and working with kids.

2.How did you hear about the show? What made you want to get involved?

I heard about the show through mandy.com and I wanted to be involved because I love theatre and I think that the concept of Wait Until Dark is so cool because the main character is a blind woman who saves herself.

3.What has been your favourite moment in rehearsal so far?

For me this show’s been great because I’ve learned so much from the people around me. Everyone is very talented and I’ve learned a lot about acting and the industry.

4.How do you prepare for playing a role like Gloria?

In order to prepare for Gloria, I really just spent a lot of time trying to understand her choices and her thought process. Gloria as a character is pretty sad because she has such a tough home life and even though she acts really tough (and mean sometimes) she’s really just a little kid.

5.Why should everyone come see the show?

Everyone should come see Wait Until Dark because it’s very unique considering the time it was written in. In this day in age everyone’s talking more and more about female empowerment, and I believe that this play demonstrates a strong female lead. It’s also a really fun thriller!

6. Anything else you want to add? 

Thanks to my family especially my mom for getting me to and from rehearsals and to my friends in drama at school for being so supportive.

Are you a high school student interested in theatre? Take advantage of our PA Day Discount and see Abby onstage Friday April 15th at 1pm – tickets only $15 for students with valid id, buy them online now.

Cast Spotlight – Mark Nocent

Mark Nocent plays the con man Mike in our upcoming production of Wait Until Dark. Mark and director Emily Dix had first worked together back in 2012 on a short play titled Noble Savages for the Newborn Theatre Odds & Ends Festival.

1. Tell us a bit about yourself, what do you do when you’re not rehearsing for Wait Until Dark?

I hold a position with an escape game company, which runs games out of Casa Loma. I’ve been performing within games for a number of rewarding months, and recently became a puzzle fabricator for their newest game, Station M, a spy themed game set in the tunnels of the castle. I’m building a board game currently, and just generally enjoying life!

2. How did you hear about the show? What made you want to get involved?

Emily reached out to me, and I had wanted to work with her again after doing a short one act a number of years ago. She sent me the script for WUD and I loved it, so I had to audition.

3. What has been your favourite moment in rehearsal so far?

Jeeeze, so many. Cynical life lessons for Abby, terrific Italian accents, 1950’s radio shows, discussions about dead bodies. Plus the process itself is a pleasure with such a great group of humans.

4. How do you prepare for playing a role like Mike? 

Mike is certainly in my wheelshouse, but there’s a lot of tension going on in every scene, and prepping for it has involved combing the scenes looking for moments to de-stress, and how Mike can do that.

5. Why should everyone come see the show?

This show is fun. The audience is immediately let in on the plan, and gets to watch it unfold, and watch the characters sweat when things go wrong. It’s a thriller, who wouldn’t want to see it?

See Mark in this captivating thriller April 14-16th in the rehearsal hall at Tarragon Theatre. Tickets on sale now.

Mid Century Luggage Tags

One of the necessary set pieces for Wait Until Dark is a suitcase with travel stickers, and so I’ve been scouring the internet for some of my favourite mid-century designs.

It’s really unfortunate that these are no longer used by hotels and airways, because some of them were really beautifully designed, and who wouldn’t love a bag covered in them? Personally, I might print off a second set for myself and add them to my own luggage.

-E.

CASTING CALL – Audition Submissions Now Open for “WAIT UNTIL DARK”

SHOW INFO
Bygone Theatre is looking to cast the 60’s thriller, Wait Until Dark.
Non-union, profit-share production.
Show runs from April 14-16th, 2016 in the rehearsal hall at Tarragon Theatre. 5 performances.

CHARACTER BREAKDOWNS
ROAT: Lead, mid 30s – 50s, murderer & theif, intelligent, actor must be able to do a few distinct voices.

SUSY: Lead, mid 20s – early 30s, blind, a housewife (married to Sam).

MIKE: Supporting, mid 20s – early 30s, con artist recently released from jail. Not a totally bad guy, but very manipulative.

CARLINO: Supporting, mid 20s – early 30s, con artist.

SAM: Supporting, mid 20s – mid 30s, photographer, ex-marine, Susy’s husband.

GLORIA: Supporting, young girl, around 10 (**open to casting a child or a young looking woman, children under 18 must have parental consent). Stubborn & strong-willed.

POLICE OFFICERS (2): Minor, 25+

SYNOPSIS
A sinister con man, Roat, and two ex-convicts, Mike and Carlino, are about to meet their match. They have traced the location of a mysterious doll, which they are much interested in, to the Greenwich Village apartment of Sam Hendrix and his blind wife, Susy. Sam had apparently been persuaded by a strange woman to transport the doll across the Canadian border, not knowing that sewn inside were several grams of heroin. When the woman is murdered the situation becomes more urgent. The con man and his ex-convicts, through a cleverly constructed deception, convince Susy that the police have implicated Sam in the woman’s murder, and the doll, which she believes is the key to his innocence, is evidence. She refuses to reveal its location, and with the help of a young neighbor, figures out she is the victim of a bizarre charade. But when Roat kills his associates, a deadly game of cat and mouse ensues between the two. Susy knows the only way to play fair is by her rules, so when darkness falls she turns off all the lights leaving both of them to maneuver in the dark until the game ends. (from Dramatist Play Service website).

AUDITIONS
To apply for an audition, send a recent headshot & artistic resume to director Emily Dix at emily@bygonetheatre.com, with the subject line: “Wait Until Dark Auditions”, no later than 5:00PM ON MONDAY FEBRUARY 1ST, 2016. Those selected to audition will be contacted via email to arrange a time.

Retro Christmas Countdown – Xmas in the 20th Century

While Christmas dates back hundreds of years before, it was the start of the 20th century that saw the turn towards the lavish and very commercial holiday that we all know today. Here’s a very brief history of Christmas traditions from the last century.

1900s

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The first Christmas card was created in 1843 by John Horsley, and by the turn of the century the Victorian’s love of sentimental greetings had made this a popular tradition.

The Victorian styles of decorating carried into the start of the 20th century, with gilded nuts, candles and paper ornaments adorning trees.

This decade also saw the creation of what was to become one of the most popular children’s toys of the century; the Teddy Bear. Named after President Roosevelt, the charming story of the origin of this toy and its name can be read here.

1910s

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As Christmas rapidly became a highly commercialized holiday, more and more companies used it as a means of selling their products, and the image of Santa Claus began to morph into the one we are familiar with today. It was in the 1910s that Santa’s now unmistakable look, with red suit and pants trimmed in white fur, matching cap and long white beard, began to become the norm.

While a legend has grown that claims Coca Cola invented the modern-day image of Santa, that is not quite the case. Prior to the famous Coca Cola Santa (who was created in 1931), the jolly elf had been portrayed as anything from tall and lanky to a munchkin-sized man. Norman Rockwell had painted a Santa who is strikingly similar to the 30s Coke version all the way back in 1911, however it wasn’t until Coke began regularly producing consistent looking Christmas ads that the current version of St. Nick really began to stick.

For an interesting pictorial history of Santa, check out this link.

1920s

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By the 1920s the upper class had traded-in their candles for electric Christmas lights, and trees were as lavish and daring as the fashions of the decades.

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With the rising popularity of the wireless (radio), the 1920s also saw the first Christmas radio broadcast when, in 1922, Arthur Burrow presented “The Truth About Father Christmas”.

1930s

rockefeller-center-christmas-tree-1931

Rockefeller Centre, 1931

In the midst of the Great Depression few had money to spend on food and clothing, let alone Christmas gifts and decorations. Still, the tradition of putting up a tree hung on, with many families owning decorations they had purchased in the more prosperous 1920s. Homemade ornaments also adorned the tree, made out of things like the foil paper saved from cigarette packs. As previously mentioned, Coca Cola started to advertise with their own version of Santa, and upbeat Christmas songs were enjoyed on the radio. Advertisements still bombarded shoppers with ideas for the perfect Christmas gift, only their tactics had changed; a focus on the practical and sometimes financing options were promoted.

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The popular character Rudolph, everyone’s favourite red-nosed reindeer, was created in 1939 by Montgomery Ward. Although it wasn’t until a decade later when Gene Autry released the song that we’ve all learned as kids.

rudolph

1940s

The 1940s saw the Second World War, and with that came rations and a reminder that the war effort should be supported above all else. Sales in non-necessities like Christmas lights dropped dramatically as many companies changed their focus to assist in the war effort. War bonds were promoted as a perfect gift for any family member or friend, and Santa himself switched his classic red & white outfit to don army duds and support the cause.

With many families missing fathers, brothers and sons overseas, Christmas could have been a bittersweet time. However, back home the masses were reminded to keep their spirits up while fighting the good fight, so many Christmas celebrations resumed some of the splendour they had seen before the Depression.

vmail_wwii_christmas

1950s

The post-war boom made the Christmas of the 1950s one of the biggest and gaudiest yet. The Baby Boom meant there were lots of families with youngsters, and so the toy market was buzzing. Wide-spread prosperity meant most were lucky enough to be able to afford Christmas celebrations, and women’s magazines, eager to encourage them to return to the home, now that the war was over, pushed for the ideal Christmas season, full of elaborate recipes and decor.

Television was also becoming popular and with it came a host of Christmas specials. Stars like Nat King Cole and Bing Crosby recorded Christmas songs and popular shows like I Love Lucy recorded special Christmas episodes.

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1960s

By the 1960s, the fads of the 50s were firmly cemented; every toy imaginable was available on the market and they were advertised directly to children in between the cartoons they watched on tv. The Christmas shows we still see today – Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, Santa Claus is Coming to Town and Frosty the Snowman – first appeared on the airwaves and decorations were more colourful and outlandish than ever before.

There was significant variety now as well. Christmas trees could be anything from your traditional green pine, to the popular aluminum trees that came in silver, aqua and even pink! And don’t forget the fake snow! The concept of “Kitschmas” was truly born in the 1960s.

What’s your favourite Christmas decade? Tweet your replies to @BygoneTheatre #RetroXmas 

-E.