Cast Spotlight: Kevin Forster

Kevin Forster Bygone Theatre Loot

Kevin Forster plays Hal in our upcoming production of Loot; this is Kevin’s first production with Bygone Theatre.

Bio: Kevin is a graduate of the Ryerson Theatre School and is thrilled to be working with such an amazing team on this wacky and wonderful show! 

Selected Theatre: Leaf Coneybear in The 25th Annual Putnam county Spelling Bee and Marshall/Al in Seven Stories (Hart House Theatre), Peter in The Diary of Anne Frank (FSWC), Joe in Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story, Bjorn in Always Abba, and Flotsam in The Little Mermaid (The Lower Ossington Theatre), Jay in New Order (NovelSidwalk), Goneril in Cinderella, and Dopey in Balm In Gilead (Ryerson Theatre School), Clown in Bust-ed (Toronto Festival of Clowns).
Television/Film: Well Spent, Fear Thy Neighbor, God Hates A Coward, A Midsummer Nights Dream

What made you want to be a part of Loot?

Loot is a really funny script with so much potential when it is put on stage. I am a big fan of physical comedy, and this script is filled with opportunity to explore that.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

I really enjoy playing Hal. It is an interesting balance finding the humor in the scenario while keeping the truth and integrity of who he is. Also, we both love to frequent brothels, so that helps.

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

My favourite part of rehearsal is playing with the other actors. Every time we run through a scene, new things are discovered. Everyone is willing to allow things to evolve and explore. It may not be right, but we won’t know until we go there.

What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?

Non dairy creamer

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

Recently was in a production of “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” I am also in a folk rock band called “People Walking By” We play all the time so check us out! @people.walking.by

Why should people come out and see the show?

It’s a show with British accents, money, and death. What could be better? Certainly beats sitting at home swiping through dating profiles. Unless those profiles include British accents, money, and death. Then you’ve got a hard decision to make.

Anything else you want us to know?

The dot on top of the letter ‘i’ and ‘j’ is known as a tittle.

You can see Kevin onstage March 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre.
Get your tickets today!

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Cast Spotlight: Scott McCulloch

Scott McCulloch Bygone Theatre Loot

Scott McCulloch plays Truscott – a council employee from the Metropolitan Water Board, and certainly not a police Inspector – in our upcoming production of Joe Orton’s Loot.

Bio: Loot marks the first time in a career spanning more than 30 years, well over 100 plays and close to 50 film and television productions. that he has appeared A) with Bygone Theatre B) at the Alumnae, and C) (fulfilling a long-time ambition) in one of Mr. Orton’s plays. He is delighted on all counts. Scott has been exceptionally busy doing indie theatre over the last two years, with his work including productions of Three Sisters (Wolf Manor Theatre Collective), Titus Andronicus and Edward Albee’s The Play About The Baby (Seven Siblings), Den of Thieves (which he directed for Triple Bypass Productions) Hogtown (the largest collective in Toronto theatre history) at Campbell House, and The Trial of Judith K for Thought For Food at the TPM Backspace for which he received a Broadway World: Toronto nomination for best performance by a male in a featured role. Dad in The Dreamer Examines His Pillow (JR Theatre), Richard in Time Stands Still (Leroy Street Theatre) and Dr. Black in the dora award winning The Belle of Winnipeg (Keystone Theatre) are just a few of his other favourite stage roles. Favourite experiences in front of the camera include the films “Blood Empires”, “Phone Company Man”, “The Lady of Names”, and episodes of “My Babysitter’s a Vampire”, “Mayday”, “Aaron Stone”, and “Relic Hunter.” Watch for Scott on the festival circuit in the short films, “Fowl Play” and “Split.” He holds a BFA from the University of Windsor, and an MFA from Northern Illinois University.

What made you want to be a part of Loot?

I’ve always wanted to do one of Orton’s plays, so I was all over it as soon as I saw the audition notice.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

Truscott’s probably not the most admirable of human beings, but I love playing him. The longer I work on the role, the more I find I do have in common with him, to a greater or lesser degree, but the first thing that jumped out at me was the need to be the smartest person in the room. I’ve been trying to work on that in my personal life, but as Truscott, I can give it free reign. And of course there’s the whole wearing of women’s underclothes thing. There’s no actual mention of that in the script, but I’m pretty sure he does.

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

My favourite part of the rehearsal process so far has been just getting to play in the Orton sandbox with such a talented group of playmates.

What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?

My favourite thing to come out of the 60’s? Well, I’m dating myself here, I suppose, but . . . me. And the Rolling Stones.

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

A web series project (which co-stars Luba Goy) that I’m involved with is being pitched to potential investors in March in NYC, so I’d love it if people could give our FB page a like: www.facebook.com/savecaptjakes/ Several episodes are already available for viewing there too. I also have several short films in the can which should be popping up at various festivals before too long: 45, Fowl Play, Split, and Roadmarks. And a feature I did a few years back, Blood Empires, is still widely available online.

Why should people come out and see the show?

Orton was ahead of his time, but sadly he didn’t live long enough to write more than a handful of plays and they don’t get done nearly enough. Here’s a rare opportunity to see one of his best, performed by a crackerjack cast. Did I mention it’s hilarious?

Anything else you want us to know?
Diet Coke is even worse for you than regular Coke.
[DIRECTOR’S NOTE: I feel this may be directed specifically at me, but I choose to ignore it!]

See Scott onstage March 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre in Toronto. Get your tickets now!

Cast Spotlight: Jonah McGrath

Jonah McGrath Bygone Theatre Loot
Jonah McGrath plays police inspector Meadows in Bygone Theatre’s upcoming production of the Joe Orton farce, Loot; this is Jonah’s first production with Bygone Theatre.
Bio: Jonah McGrath is a 23 year old performer from Toronto. He graduated from the Dramatic Arts program at Brock University in 2017 with a concentration in performance. Jonah has acted in a multitude of theatrical productions over the past seven years including: Play by Samuel Beckett, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny by Bertolt Brecht, The Man in the Case by Anton Chekov and many more. Jonah is ecstatic to be a part of Bygone Theatre’s Loot ensemble and for the personal artistic growth and sheer hilarity that are bound to result from such a fabulous opportunity.
What made you want to be a part of Loot?

I was instantly drawn the hilarity of the plot of Loot. For nearly as long as I’ve been an actor I have loved good comedies and more specifically good english farces. It’s also worth noting that 
have just recently moved to Toronto and I was keen for the opportunity to connect with/work with fellow theatre artists from the city.
How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

Meadows is an unquestioningly obedient sidekick to Truscott. As a result of his steadfast loyalty to the British police force he remains quite aloof throughout the entirety of the play. I can certainly identify with this to some degree. There have most definitely been times in my life when my unquestioning faith in social constructs have lead me into a state of aloofness.

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

Well, I think that the cast that’s been assembled for this production is both infinitely talented and funny. Just being given the opportunity to observe their exploration of the script and their respective characters has been immensely funny and informative as a growing artist.

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

At the moment, I’m also working with a group of past peers and professors from Brock University on a devised theatre piece entitled We Who Know Nothing About Hiawatha. This production will explore the extreme societal disconnect between the indigenous population and the rest of Canadian society. This show will be staged at the In The Soil Arts Festival in downtown St Catharines over the course of late April. 
Why should people come out and see the show?
Because it’s hilarious! I also believe that this piece is remarkably relevant to a modern Canadian audience. Joe Orton provides a wealth of commentary on those in positions of authority and social attitudes towards death which I think will most definitely resonate with Toronto show goers. If you’re a fan of either absurdist humour or scathing British commentary then this is the show for you!
Anything else you want us to know?
Come and check out We Who Know Nothing About Hiawatha as well as a variety of other theatrical productions and artistic exhibits at the In The Soil Arts Festival in St Catharines. The festival will run from April 27th to the 29th.
See Jonah onstage March 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre. Tickets on sale now.

Cast Spotlight: Patrick Young

Patrick Young Bygone Theatre Loot

Patrick Young plays the recently widowed Mr. McLeavy in our upcoming production of Loot; this is Patrick’s first production with Bygone Theatre.

Bio: Patrick retired last year from Sheridan College, where he founded the joint actor-training program with University of Toronto Mississauga and headed it for 25 years. He directed two shows for Theatre Sheridan and twenty-something for Theatre Erindale, from The Importance of Being Earnest and The Maid’s Tragedy to Picnic and Unity (1918). He has also been Artistic Director of Dalhousie Theatre Productions, Associate Director of the Lighthouse Theatre Festival, and Director/Dramaturg of the Muskoka Festival Musical Theatre Writer’s Colony, and is the author of four award-winning biographical plays (three of them with music by Bob Ashley) as well as several adaptations of classics. In his earlier incarnation as an actor, his Toronto credits included the record-breaking hits Flicks, The Relapse, and the original production of Automatic Pilot, as well as Chinchilla and the last national tour of Spring Thaw. Elsewhere the range included Misalliance and Threepenny Opera in Boston, Uncle Vanya and Tobacco Road in Indiana, Windsor in Charlottetown, Dames at Sea in Winnipeg, Hay Fever across BC and Scapin across Ontario, plus guest starring on such TV series as The Great Detective and Night Heat.

What made you want to be a part of Loot?
As soon as I had a chance to re-read it, I knew I wanted to play Mr. McLeavy. So I looked up Bygone Theatre and was pretty impressed. Then I asked to audition and the rest is history.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

McLeavy is a breath of ostensible normality in a world gone mad. With his naïve trust in institutions and authority (at a time when we’re doubting them more than ever!), he throws the point of the play into perspective. And don’t we all wish that we had reason to get that trust back?

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

We’re just starting it – it’s getting the play on its feet to explore the possibilities and test the choices. And I love working with my talented cast-mates!

What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?

I was at university then so that’s easy: The Beatles! Though I should also mention the beginnings of the sexual revolution. We all benefit from both of them!

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

Not yet, but my production of THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST for Theatre Erindale was chosen one of the Ten Best shows west of Toronto in 2017 – including Stratford and Shaw (!) — by the Ontario Arts Review. I’m definitely game for more acting or directing, but as I just retired from a full-time College Professorship, I’m not in a rush. And I have travel plans!

Why should people come out and see the show?

Because it’s going to be so much fun! It’s so cynical that it’s the perfect antidote to today’s cynicism!

Anything else you want us to know?

Yes – the link to the go-fund-me campaign!

See Patrick onstage March 8-17th, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre.
Get your tickets now!

Cast Spotlight: Kenton Blythe

Kenton Blythe Bygone Theatre Loot

Kenton Blythe is playing trouble-maker Dennis in our upcoming production of Loot. You may remember Kenton from one of our Retro Radio Hours, or from his role as Max Halliday in Dial M For Murder, back in 2013.

Renting out a professional theatre and building flats for Dial M For Murder were major costs.

Kenton Blythe and Rebekah Manella in Dial M For Murder, 2013

Bio: Kenton is excited to be farcing around with you and this awesome cast. Selected Theatre Credits include: Grey (Toronto Fringe)[Best Ensemble Nominee My Entertainment World], Heart of Steel (Next Stage Fest.) Cabaret. Juno and the Paycock (Shaw Festival), Evil Dead: The Musical (Starvox Ent. w/ Jeffery Latimer Ent.), Dial M for Murder (Bygone Theatre) Selected Film: Sandman: 24 Hour Diner (Youtube / Vimeo), Reign (The CW), Blood and Fury: America’s Civil War (AHC), Looking For Today (Canadian Film Fest.) Twitter: @KentonBlythe IG: @KentonBlythe Youtube: Kenton Blythe

What made you want to be a part of Loot?

I loved the script when I read it and I always get cast as murders and racists, so a farce is a lovely change of pace.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?
Dennis is fun loving, scatter brained, and perpetually horny. Yes.
What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?
Figuring out how to make everything I say sexual in some way. Don’t know if they’ll all make opening night…
What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?
The Beatles, and my Aunties (All of them.)
Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?
Check out my youtube channel and facebook page for highlights from the show I wrote and performed at the 120 Diner in November 2017. Conor Fitzgerald (One of the producers of this show) and I made a movie that premiered at the Canadian Film Festival in 2016 called Looking For Today which is also on Youtube. Finally you should check out the Sandman fan film I was in called Sandman: 24 Hour Diner.
Why should people come out and see the show?
We have all the comedy of a corpse without the smell.
Anything else you want us to know?
Here are all my social media outlets, you should totally follow them:
Twitter: @KentonBlythe
Instagram: @KentonBlythe
Facebook: Kenton Blythe (the page)
YouTube: Kenton Blythe
You can see Kenton Blythe onstage at the Alumnae Theatre March 8-17, 2018.
Get your tickets online now.

Cast Spotlight: Sarah Thorpe

Sarah Thorpe Bygone Theatre Loot

Sarah Thorpe plays decent Catholic Fay McMahon in the upcoming production of Loot; this is Sarah’s first production with Bygone Theatre.

Bio: Theatre artist and creative core member of Soup Can Theatre. BAH Theatre from York University. Created and performed in the award-winning one-woman show Heretic, a modern retelling of the story of Joan of Arc, in 2015. Acting credits: Gut Girls (Alumnae), Titus Andronicus (Seven Siblings), Behold, the Barfly! (Spoon Vs. Hammer/TO Fringe 2016/TO SketchFest 2017), The Comedy of Errors (Confidential Shakespeare Project), The Loyalists (Single Thread), Canadian premiere of Bare (Waters Edge), The Nightwood (Luminato), inaugural production of Tomson Highway’s Pimooteewin/The Journey (Soundstreams). Soup Can credits: directing Love is a Poverty You Can Sell 1 & 2 (TO Fringe 2010 & 2013, Best of Fringe 2010, Next Stage 2012), No Exit, Marat/Sade; producing Circle Jerk, A Hand of Bridge/No Exit double bill, Antigone (TO Fringe 2012). Producing elsewhere: Let’s Go! (DMT), Gut Girls, Behold, the Barfly!. Recent recipient of two OAC grants: mentorship in directing with Alan Dilworth through Theatre Ontario’s Professional Theatre Training Program, and a recommender grant through Volcano Theatre to create a play about Maud Wagner, the first known female tattoo artist in the US in the early 1900s. Facebook.com/SarahThorpeArtist • SoupCanTheatre.com

What made you want to be a part of Loot?

I love the satire in Loot. Nothing is sacred. It’s like a Monty Python episode in that way – everything is on the table to poke fun at.

How do you feel about your character? Do you relate to them at all? Share any of the same traits?

Without giving too much away, Faye is a master manipulator but she finds herself in a situation where those skills may not be enough to help her get what she wants. We’ve all been in situations where we find ourselves in over our heads and scramble to try to get the situation back in our control.

What’s been your favourite part of the rehearsal process so far?

It’s just a really fun room to be in. It’s a farce, so I think it’s important that the atmosphere we work in is light and absurd, in a constructive way of course.

What’s your favourite thing to have come out of the 1960s?

Lots of music: David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, The Velvet Underground, Marianne Faithfull, I could go on….

Are you working on any other projects at the moment/ What might we have seen you in recently?

I recently received a recommender grant from the Ontario Arts Council (recommended via Volcano Theatre) to create a piece about Maud Wagner: a circus artist who became the first known female tattoo artist in the US in the early 1900s. I’ll be creating this piece with two friends and colleagues, one a circus artist and one a tattoo artist. Once Loot‘s run is over, I’ll be jumping in to that! 

Why should people come out and see the show?

Need a break from reality and a couple of hours to just laugh and enjoy some ridiculous hi-jinks? Get your butts to bygonetheatre.com to get your tickets!

Anything else you want us to know?

I’m not a natural blonde 😉

See Sarah onstage March 8-17th at Alumnae Theatre. Tickets on sale now.

The Loot Collective Presents Joe Orton’s LOOT

Loot Collective Bygone Theatre Toronto

FOR IMMEDATE RELEASE:
MONDAY JANUARY 8, 2018

The Loot Collective Presents Joe Orton’s 1960s Farce

LOOT

TORONTO, ON (Monday January 8, 2018) – Bygone Theatre has partnered with the Loot Collective to support their production of Loot, running March 8-17th, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St., Toronto. This is a Canadian Actor’s Equity Association production under the Artist’s Collective Policy. Directed by Emily Dix.

SYNOPSIS

England, 1965; Only hours before her intended burial, the late Mrs. McLeavy is removed from her coffin by her son, Hal (Kevin Forster), and his best pal, Dennis (Kenton Blythe), who have together just robbed a bank and need the coffin to stash the loot. The boys try to hide the corpse from the recently widowed McLeavy (Patrick Young) and his deceased wife’s nurse, Fay (Sarah Thorpe), but with Inspector Truscott (Scott McCulloch) hot on their heels, their plan quickly begins to unravel. Absurdity abounds in this dark, 1965 farce that examines attitudes surrounding death, police integrity, and the Catholic church.

ABOUT THE CAST

Patrick Young Bygone Theatre Loot

Patrick Young is Mr.McLeavy in “Loot”.

Patrick Young (Mr.McLeavy) has had an extensive career on and off stage, and may be best known in Toronto for his work at Sheridan College, where he founded the joint actor training program with the University of Toronto Mississauga. He is the author of 4 award-winning biographical plays, and has an extensive directing resume. Past acting credits in Toronto include Flicks, The Relapse and the original production of Automatic Pilot.

 

Scott McCulloch Bygone Theatre Loot

Scott McCulloch is Inspector Truscott in “Loot”.

Scott McCulloch (Truscott) has had a career spanning over 30 years, 100 plays and nearly 50 films. Recent credits include the immersive production Hogtown at Campbell House, the Wolf Manor Theatre production of Three Sisters, and the Thought For Food production of The Trial of Judith K for which he received a Broadway World Toronto nomination of Best Performance by a Male in a Featured Role.

Kenton Blythe Bygone Theatre Loot

Kenton Blythe is Dennis in “Loot”.

Kenton Blythe (Dennis), was most recently seen in the Toronto Fringe hit, Grey. Other stage credits include the Starvox Entertainment production of Evil Dead: The Musical, and a stint at the Shaw Festival, where he was seen in Juno and the Paycock and Cabaret. You may also remember Kenton from Bygone Theatre’s 2013 production of Dial M For Murder.

Sarah Thorpe Bygone Theatre Loot

Sarah Thorpe is Fay in “Loot”.

Sarah Thorpe (Fay) is a multi-talented theatre artist and a core creative member of Soup Can Theatre. She created and performed in the award-winning one-woman show Heretic, a modern retelling of Joan of Arc, in 2015, and has more recently been seen in Toronto Fringe Hit, Behold! The Barfly! and Gut Girls at Alumnae Theatre.

Kevin Forster Bygone Theatre Loot

Kevin Forster as Hal in “Loot”.

Kevin Forster (Hal) is a graduate of the Ryerson Theatre School and has been featured in several productions at the Lower Ossington Theatre, including The Buddy Holly Story, Always ABBA and The Little Mermaid. He has also performed at Hart House Theatre and in the Toronto Festival of Clowns.

Jonah McGrath Bygone Theatre Loot

Jonah McGrath is Meadows in “Loot”.

Jonah McGrath (Meadows) is a recent graduate of the Brock University Dramatic Arts program. Recent credits include Play by Samuel Beckett, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and Chekov’s The Man in the Case.

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

Emily Dix Bygone Theatre Director Producer

Director/ Producer, Emily Dix.

Emily Dix is a founding member and the Artistic Executive Director of Bygone Theatre. As a producer, she has worked with Tarragon Theatre and Theatre 20, and has produced all of Bygone Theatre’s productions to date. She got her start directing at the University of Toronto, working on shows such as the Hart House Theatre production of The Night of The Iguana as an assistant director, and directing a number of shows for the campus colleges. Bygone Theatre directing credits include; His Girl Friday; Vaudeville Revue; Wait Until Dark; Rope; Dial M For Murder and Doubt: A Parable. In addition to directing, Emily does the costume design for all of Bygone Theatre’s productions.

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
Thursday March 8 – Saturday March 10, 8:00pm
Tuesday March 13 – Saturday March 17, 8:00pm
Saturday March 10, Sunday March 11, Saturday March 17, 2:00pm matinee

Tickets: On-sale now. Available at https://loot.bpt.me

Media Contact: Producer Emily Dix, Emily@bygonetheatre.com, 647-343-5965
Twitter: @BygoneTheatre |FB: Facebook.com/BygoneTheatre |Insta: @BygoneTheatre

For group sales, press access or to request accommodation, please email Emily@bygonetheatre.com.

 This production is being produced by The Loot Collective and is being supported by
Bygone Theatre.

Bygone Theatre Rentals – Office Furniture

We recently did a production of His Girl Friday, which meant acquiring a LARGE volume of vintage office furniture and supplies; here’s some of the furniture pieces we now have available to rent.

 

  1. Vintage Wood Office Chairs: see individual pictures for details
    Rental Price: $20.00 each/wk
  2. Burgundy Faux Leather Executive Chair: see individual picture for details
    Rental Price: $30.00/wk
  3. Small Telephone Desk: see individual picture for details
    Rental Price: $15.00/wk
  4. Wood Arts & Crafts and Mid Century Modern Desks: see individual pictures for details
    Rental Price: $40.00 each/wk
  5. Metal Cabinet: see individual picture for details
    Rental Price: $15.00/wk

The styles we have available would be suitable for someone looking for something from the 1920s-60s, or something modern day with a vintage twist. Discounts available when renting multiple pieces at once, prices listed are for a single item, before HST.

Stay tuned to see some of the smaller set dressing items we have as well.

Bygone Theatre Rentals – Appliances

Bygone Theatre has finally gotten our  storage space sorted, which means we are ready to start renting out some of our great vintage pieces! Take a look at some of our larger items here; all prices listed are before HST. Please note that we are able to negotiate payment structures, and that discounts are available when renting multiple items at once. Email us at info@bygonetheatre.com with any questions, or to place an order; we require a minimum of 3 days notice for all prop rentals.

  1. Vintage Fridge: used in Wait Until Dark, gorgeous late 50s/early 60s white fridge with dusty rose interior. Inside latch has been modified to make for easier opening. Rental Price: $75.00/wk

2. Vintage Stove: used in Wait Until Dark, charming late 1940s white stove with oven.
Rental Price: $75.00/wk

3. Vintage 1950s Ringer Washer: used in Wait Until Dark, white General Electric washing machine with wringer, mid-50s, excellent condition.
Rental Price: $75.00/wk

Bygone Theatre - 1950s Wringer Washer Rental

4. Vintage 1950s Red Mini Fridge: Late 1940s/1950s, bright red mini fridge with chrome handle. Great for a photoshoot, or for a cafe/soda shop look.
Rental Price: $75/week

Bygone Theatre Red Mini Fridge

Stay tuned for much more, including vintage office supplies, props & costumes.

Crew Spotlight – Fight Director Siobhan Richardson

Siobhan Richardson is the Fight Director for Wait Until Dark.

BIO: Siobhan Richardson is a fight director and actor/fighter/singer/dancer. Fight Direction credits includeThe Trial of Judith K (Thought For Food Productions), A Christmas Story and The Hobbit (The Grand Theatre, London), White Biting Dog (Soulpepper), Such Creatures (Nightswimming and Theatre Passe Muraille), Death of a Chief (Native Earth), James and the Giant Peach and To Kill a Mockingbird (Young Peoples’ Theatre) and Frankenstein’s Boy (Eldritch Theatre). She has taught stage combat across Canada and Europe, including London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Munich, Brittany, Norway, Finland, Estonia, and Sweden, and will be teaching at the upcoming World Stage Combat Conference. Acting credits include And Then The Lights Went Out (Stage West, Calgary), Mo and Jess Kill Susie (Harley Dog Productions), and Hogtown. For further acting credits, please go to www.SiobhanRichardson.com/actor. When not pursuing her performance career, she and her partner run Burning Mountain, dedicated to the growth and development of stage combat for the art form and for the artists.

Check out the upcoming workshop on Intimacy For The Stage:  www.BurningMountain.ca/connect/StageIntimacy