Crash Course in Indie Theatre & Fringe Festival Producing

Join us for another free workshop, a crash-course in indie theatre & Fringe Festival producing!

Artistic Executive Director Emily Dix & Bygone Chair Conor Fitzgerald run this condensed version of their popular Producing 101 workshop, with a special focus on producing for Fringe shows.

Learn about scheduling, creating budgets, fundraising, marketing, and more in this interactive workshop that invites participants to come with their own show-specific questions.

Open to all, aimed towards artists working in the Greater Toronto Area.

Participation is free, but donations towards our 2022/23 season would be appreciated.

ACCESSIBILITY:

The workshop is being delivered in English with visual aids and automatically generated captions. If you require specific accommodation, please email us in advance (info@bygonetheatre.com) and we will do our best to provide you the full experience.

REQUIREMENTS:

Access to a computer with internet connection. Participants are encouraged to turn on their cameras to ask questions or make comments, but this is not required. Questions may be submitted via text as well.

No experience necessary, but will be most beneficial to those with at least a cursory knowledge of Toronto and the indie theatre community.

Please register here if you plan to attend.

Careers in the Arts – A Bygone Theatre Webinar

Interested in working in the arts, but don’t know where to start? This unique workshop will provide students with a realistic view into the arts world, guiding them through a host of career paths and the steps to follow to get there.

Interested in working in the arts, but don’t know where to start? This unique workshop will provide students with a realistic view into the arts world, guiding them through a host of career paths and the steps to follow to get there.

Bygone Artistic Executive Director Emily Dix will cover topics such as;
– Post-secondary programs here and abroad
– Skill building without formal education
– Unconventional arts related careers
– How to network in the arts
– How to build a resume or portfolio, and more.

Aimed at secondary students, this webinar is open to all, and is being subsidized through anonymous support so we can offer it FREE to all who are interested.

While you do not have to be from a specific geographic area to participate, it will be focused primarily on opportunities and practises from South Western Ontario, specifically the GTA.

No experience necessary, just an interest in learning about arts related careers, particularly those related to theatre and film.

WHEN AND WHERE:
Saturday February 26, 1-3pm.
Online via Zoom: https://yorku.zoom.us/j/93663931843 

ACCESSIBILITY: 
The webinar is being delivered in English, with visual aids and automatically generated captions. If you require specific accommodation, please email us in advance and we will do our best to provide you the full experience.

INTERACTION:
We encourage participants to turn on their cameras, at least for the discussion section at the end, but this is not required. Questions can be asked via your mic, the chat, or sent by private message if you’d like to ask anonymously.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION:
This webinar is being hosted by our Artistic Executive Director Emily Dix, a white woman with an invisible disability. She will share her personal experiences working in the arts and will provide info for programs and opportunities that exist for marginalized people as well as those open to all.

If you have any questions prior to the webinar, or to request accommodation, please email emily@bygonetheatre.com.

Careers in the Arts Workshop

Interested in working in the arts, but don’t know where to start? This workshop, geared towards high school students & recent grads, will show you the way. Oct 23, 2-4pm, $20.

Interested in working in the arts, but don’t know where to start? This workshop, geared towards high school students & recent grads, will show you the way. Oct 23, 2-4pm, $20.

WHAT: Careers in the Arts Workshop

WHEN: Saturday October 23, 2-4pm ET

WHERE: Online

HOW MUCH: $20 CAD (payable via PayPal or e-transfer)

WHAT’S NEEDED: Access to a computer with a steady internet connection, a computer with a working speaker and either a microphone or the ability to type.

WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Interested in working in the arts, but don’t know where to start? This unique workshop will provide students with a realistic view into the arts world, guiding them through a host of career paths and the steps to follow to get there. Bygone Artistic Executive Director Emily Dix will cover topics such as;

  • Post-secondary programs here and abroad
  • Skill building without formal education
  • Unconventional arts related careers
  • How to network in the arts
  • How to build a resume or portfolio, and more.

WHO IT’S FOR: This course has been designed for Ontario senior high school students but is appropriate for recent graduates as well. Best suited for those living in the GTA. Recommended for people aged 17-20, however there is no age cut-off.

ACCESSIBILITY: Auto-captioning is provided through the program, however it is not always the most accurate. If this is something you’d require, please reach out at info@bygonetheatre.com and we will do our best to accommodate. Program is delivered in English and is best suited to fluent English speakers. Financial assistance is available for those who require it – email info@bygonetheatre.com for more details.

WHO’S RUNNING IT: Taught by Emily Dix and Conor Fitzgerald.

School Workshops

Bygone is thrilled to be offering three new student workshops for our 2021/22 season – available in-person or online.

School Workshops | Grade 7-12 | Online or In-Person | $175 per class of 30

Bygone is thrilled to be offering three new workshops for our 2021/22 season.

Careers in the Arts: 

Interested in working in the arts, but don’t know where to start? This unique workshop will provide students with a realistic view into the arts world, guiding them through a host of career paths and the steps to follow to get there. Bygone Artistic Executive Director Emily Dix will cover topics such as;

  • Post-secondary programs here and abroad
  • Skill building without formal education
  • Unconventional arts related careers
  • How to network in the arts
  • How to build a resume or portfolio, and more.

This workshop can benefit not only arts students, but any senior high school students who are considering future career paths. Also available as a large-scale presentation for an entire grade or school; contact us for pricing. 

The Audition Process:

There’s so much more to auditioning than what happens in the audition room, and how you prepare is just as important as how well you perform. Director Emily Dix will walk students through all the key aspects of the audition process, including;

  • Where to find auditions
  • How to get an agent
  • How to pick a monologue
  • How to format a performance resume
  • What to look for in a headshot
  • How to build your “brand” online
  • Audition etiquette, and more. 

Something From Nothing: How To Produce Your First Show:

Recommended for senior high school students, this workshop is a crash-course in indie theatre producing. Topics include:

  • Picking the right show
  • Casting
  • Creating a budget
  • Dealing with venues
  • Raising funds
  • Marketing, and more.

Workshops are available both in-person (in Toronto) and online via Zoom starting September 2021. Email emily@bygonetheatre.com for more details or to register a class. 

A Note from Our Artistic Executive Director

A message from Artistic  Executive Director Emily Dix regarding Bygone Theatre’s commitment to diversity and accessibility;

When I started Bygone Theatre back in 2012 my main goal was to produce engaging, character-driven theatre from the early 20th century – there were stories I wanted to see onstage that were only available at big companies, like Soulpepper, Stratford or Shaw, and I wanted something similar but on a smaller, more accessible scale. I set about making theatre with whomever I could find, and focused more on the work than those involved. Now, as Bygone Theatre enters our 9th season, it is clear we need to expand our focus and work harder to prioritize our commitments to diversity and accessibility; simply saying “all are welcome” and using wheelchair accessible spaces is not enough. We need to make concrete, measurable changes in order to better serve our community and our work.

As a company that produces “vintage theatre”, we are in a unique position when it comes to diversity. We have the opportunity to re-examine stories through a more authentic lens, looking at them not from the perspective of turn-of-the-century, primarily white audience members, but through one of historical insight, that acknowledges that the world has always contained diverse communities with fascinating stories, even if they weren’t being published or produced.

Plays from the 1920s-60s often feature racist stereotypes, that or they completely white-wash the story and show no diversity at all. When re-staging these stories it can be easy to fall into the trap of eliminating the overt racism while still maintaining the subvert – colourblind casting, 2-dimensional characters, or tokenism. Does that mean these stories are no longer relevant, or not worth retelling? No. But they do need to be redone. And that needs to be done with care.

While diversity and accessibility have always been important to us, we have admittedly existed in a bit of a bubble. Attempts to engage communities outside of my own have rarely been met with much success, and to be honest, the difficulty in doing this lead to me not making it a top priority. I do the majority of the work for Bygone on my own, and I did not know how to engage people past simply putting the message out there, and I never had time to really learn how.

Then COVID-19 happened.

After the initial upset of coming to terms with the uncertain year ahead of us, we at Bygone came to the realization that this “break” in the regular programming is exactly what we need. We are taking this time to learn and improve, not just as artists, but as people, and a part of the Toronto theatre community. We are listening to the voices speaking out against discrimination in the arts (the #InTheDressingRoom thread on Twitter was eye-opening and deeply upsetting). We are listening to the voices telling us how to be better allies. And we are taking time to make important changes and commitments, and to share that with you now as a commitment to change and accountability. This is not a final comment, it is a series of first steps. As we continue to learn and grow we will readdress these commitments, make more, and do more. I will make these a priority, and am working on learning how to do more. The following statements come from myself, and the Bygone Theatre Board of Directors:

Bygone Theatre believes Black Lives Matter.

Bygone Theatre sees the racism faced by BIPOC communities, believes their stories and stands with them in solidarity.

Bygone Theatre sees the homophobia and prejudice members of the LGBTQ2+ community faces, believes their stories and stands with them in solidarity.

Bygone Theatre sees the women who face sexism and discrimination, the members of the #MeToo movement, believes their stories and stands with them in solidarity.

Bygone Theatre sees the challenges and discrimination faced by Mad/Disabled communities, believes their stories and stands with them in solidarity.

We are making a commitment to support all these communities, prioritize their members and stories in our work, and to continue to work to become better allies. The following is our Commitment to Diversity and Accessibility, as of June 30, 2020.

BYGONE THEATRE DIVERSITY & ACCESSIBILITY STATEMENTS

OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY

Auditions & Casting

  • 50% of all audition slots will be reserved for those who self-identify as BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, Person of Colour)

  • Our Diversity & Accessibility statements will be included on all audition postings

  • We will begin our casting process earlier than we have in the past in order to make time to submit postings to diverse communities currently outside of our network

  • We will continue to provide character breakdowns that do not include physical attributes or race (unless essential to the story) and will promote colour-conscious casting

  • Casting will prioritize actors that have the shared experience of the character ​​

Rehearsal Process​

  • The first day of rehearsal will include a talk about equity, diversity and inclusion​

  • All cast members will be required to sign a contract that includes a code of conduct which addresses equity, anti-racism and sexual harassment – this will include a clear structure breakdown for a complaint and resolution process

  • Should we produce a show that centres around a character or story about a diverse community, we will hire a consultant or creative team member from that community to address any issues both in the play and the rehearsal room

Production Process​

  • We will prioritize the hiring of female, LGBTQ2+, Mad/Disabled and BIPOC production artists*​

  • We will prioritize businesses run by women, LGBTQ2+, Mad/Disabled and BIPOC folks when purchasing items for our company or productions

  • We will research the companies that we patronize to ensure they have values consistent with our own

*At the time of writing Bygone Theatre is without any consistent funding, and so our productions rely heavily on the support of volunteers. When we achieve a status that allows us regular operating funding we will re-address this and make a more concrete commitment to diversity numbers, but at the moment many roles are filled by our Artistic Executive Director (who often produces, directs and designs our shows) and whomever chooses to volunteer.

OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCESSIBILITY

Auditions & Casting

  • We will provide accessible auditions by prioritizing accessible spaces, and, when not available, allowing self-tapes or other opportunities for audition submission

  • We will clearly state the accessibility issues with any space we use, and will provide accommodation whenever necessary

  • We will clearly state all accessibility issues and potential solutions on all casting and production calls – for example, roles that can be fulfilled from home or that can be completed on a flexible schedule​ will be stated clearly so as to encourage those with accessibility issues to apply

  • We will continue to hold rehearsals in spaces that are accessible by the TTC

  • We will continue to create flexible rehearsal schedules that value actor’s time

Rehearsal & Production Process​

  • We will continue to encourage open communication especially around issues of accessibility, and will provide accommodation as necessary

  • We will continue to provide a judgement-free zone and will consult with cast and crew privately to ensure all of their needs are being met

  • We will provide all cast and crew with a clear breakdown of roles, responsibilities and hierarchy in order to ensure clear communication, and will include protocols for submitting concerns or complaints

Audience & Community

  • We will continue to prioritize accessible performance spaces and advertise possible accommodations

  • We will continue to provide ticket discounts to disadvantaged groups

  • We will continue to offer Relaxed Performances (dependent on show)

Broadway World Award Winners

The Broadway World Toronto Award Winners have been announced! Congratulations to all the winners and nominees, including;

EMILY DIX – Best Director, The Rear Window


Emily Dix

TRISTAN CLAXTON – Best Performance by a Leading Actor, The Rear Window


TRW_Tristan Claxton

KATE MCARTHUR – Best Performance by a Featured Actress, The Rear Window


TRW_Lena Cute

WESLEY BABCOCK – Best Original Lighting Design, The Rear Window

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THOMAS FINN – Best Cabaret Performance, A Rat Packed Christmas

Thomas Finn Headshot

See the complete list of winners here.

Broadway World Toronto Award Nominations

We’re thrilled to have a total of 14 nominations for the Broadway World Toronto Awards, 11 of which are for people involved in our March 2019 production of The Rear Window.

TRW_Tristan Claxton
Tristan Claxton as Jeff in The Rear Window.

Congratulations and best of luck to all those who are nominated, voting only takes a couple of minutes and can be done here. Bygone is honoured to be recognized in the following categories;

Best Community Theatre – Bygone Theatre
Best Direction of a Play (Equity) – Emily Dix (The Rear Window)
Best Play (Equity) – The Rear Window
Best Independent Theatre ProductionThe Rear Window
Best Leading Actor (Play, Equity) – Tristan Claxton (The Rear Window)
Best Leading Actress (Play, Equity) – Kate McArthur (The Rear Window)
Best Original Costume Design – Emily Dix (The Rear Window)
Best Original Set Design – Emily Dix (The Rear Window)
Best Original Lighting Design – Wes Babcock (The Rear Window)
Best Performance by a Female in a Featured Role (Play, Equity) – Kate McArthur (The Rear Window)
Best Performance by a Male in a Featured Role (Play, Equity) – Tristan Claxton, Alex Clay (The Rear Window)
Best Cabaret Performance – Thomas Finn, A Rat-Packed Christmas, Crooning Comics and A Night With Frank & Judy
Thank you to all the talented and lovely people who we’ve worked with this past year, here’s to many more!

The Loot Collective Presents Joe Orton’s LOOT

Press release for the Loot Collective’s production of Joe Orton’s “Loot”, supported by Bygone Theatre. Running Mar. 8-17, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre, Toronto.

FOR IMMEDATE RELEASE:
MONDAY JANUARY 8, 2018

The Loot Collective Presents Joe Orton’s 1960s Farce

LOOT

TORONTO, ON (Monday January 8, 2018) – Bygone Theatre has partnered with the Loot Collective to support their production of Loot, running March 8-17th, 2018 at the Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St., Toronto. This is a Canadian Actor’s Equity Association production under the Artist’s Collective Policy. Directed by Emily Dix.

SYNOPSIS

England, 1965; Only hours before her intended burial, the late Mrs. McLeavy is removed from her coffin by her son, Hal (Kevin Forster), and his best pal, Dennis (Kenton Blythe), who have together just robbed a bank and need the coffin to stash the loot. The boys try to hide the corpse from the recently widowed McLeavy (Patrick Young) and his deceased wife’s nurse, Fay (Sarah Thorpe), but with Inspector Truscott (Scott McCulloch) hot on their heels, their plan quickly begins to unravel. Absurdity abounds in this dark, 1965 farce that examines attitudes surrounding death, police integrity, and the Catholic church.

ABOUT THE CAST

Patrick Young Bygone Theatre Loot
Patrick Young is Mr.McLeavy in “Loot”.

Patrick Young (Mr.McLeavy) has had an extensive career on and off stage, and may be best known in Toronto for his work at Sheridan College, where he founded the joint actor training program with the University of Toronto Mississauga. He is the author of 4 award-winning biographical plays, and has an extensive directing resume. Past acting credits in Toronto include Flicks, The Relapse and the original production of Automatic Pilot.

 

Scott McCulloch Bygone Theatre Loot
Scott McCulloch is Inspector Truscott in “Loot”.

Scott McCulloch (Truscott) has had a career spanning over 30 years, 100 plays and nearly 50 films. Recent credits include the immersive production Hogtown at Campbell House, the Wolf Manor Theatre production of Three Sisters, and the Thought For Food production of The Trial of Judith K for which he received a Broadway World Toronto nomination of Best Performance by a Male in a Featured Role.

Kenton Blythe Bygone Theatre Loot
Kenton Blythe is Dennis in “Loot”.

Kenton Blythe (Dennis), was most recently seen in the Toronto Fringe hit, Grey. Other stage credits include the Starvox Entertainment production of Evil Dead: The Musical, and a stint at the Shaw Festival, where he was seen in Juno and the Paycock and Cabaret. You may also remember Kenton from Bygone Theatre’s 2013 production of Dial M For Murder.

Sarah Thorpe Bygone Theatre Loot
Sarah Thorpe is Fay in “Loot”.

Sarah Thorpe (Fay) is a multi-talented theatre artist and a core creative member of Soup Can Theatre. She created and performed in the award-winning one-woman show Heretic, a modern retelling of Joan of Arc, in 2015, and has more recently been seen in Toronto Fringe Hit, Behold! The Barfly! and Gut Girls at Alumnae Theatre.

Kevin Forster Bygone Theatre Loot
Kevin Forster as Hal in “Loot”.

Kevin Forster (Hal) is a graduate of the Ryerson Theatre School and has been featured in several productions at the Lower Ossington Theatre, including The Buddy Holly Story, Always ABBA and The Little Mermaid. He has also performed at Hart House Theatre and in the Toronto Festival of Clowns.

Jonah McGrath Bygone Theatre Loot
Jonah McGrath is Meadows in “Loot”.

Jonah McGrath (Meadows) is a recent graduate of the Brock University Dramatic Arts program. Recent credits include Play by Samuel Beckett, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and Chekov’s The Man in the Case.

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

Emily Dix Bygone Theatre Director Producer
Director/ Producer, Emily Dix.

Emily Dix is a founding member and the Artistic Executive Director of Bygone Theatre. As a producer, she has worked with Tarragon Theatre and Theatre 20, and has produced all of Bygone Theatre’s productions to date. She got her start directing at the University of Toronto, working on shows such as the Hart House Theatre production of The Night of The Iguana as an assistant director, and directing a number of shows for the campus colleges. Bygone Theatre directing credits include; His Girl Friday; Vaudeville Revue; Wait Until Dark; Rope; Dial M For Murder and Doubt: A Parable. In addition to directing, Emily does the costume design for all of Bygone Theatre’s productions.

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
Thursday March 8 – Saturday March 10, 8:00pm
Tuesday March 13 – Saturday March 17, 8:00pm
Saturday March 10, Sunday March 11, Saturday March 17, 2:00pm matinee

Tickets: On-sale now. Available at https://loot.bpt.me

Media Contact: Producer Emily Dix, Emily@bygonetheatre.com, 647-343-5965
Twitter: @BygoneTheatre |FB: Facebook.com/BygoneTheatre |Insta: @BygoneTheatre

For group sales, press access or to request accommodation, please email Emily@bygonetheatre.com.

 This production is being produced by The Loot Collective and is being supported by
Bygone Theatre.

Bygone Theatre’s 2017/18 Season

Bygone Theatre’s 2017/18 season announcement.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2017

Bygone Theatre Announces its 6th Season

TORONTO, ON (Tuesday September 26, 2017) – Now entering their sixth season, Toronto based, indie nonprofit, Bygone Theatre announces their season lineup, which includes a classic 1965 British farce, a unique night of vintage Vaudeville, and the World Premiere of a new Canadian play.

Loot Front 4_x_6

LOOT by Joe Orton
Directed by Emily Dix

England, 1965; Only hours before her intended burial, the late Mrs. Leavy is removed from her coffin by her son, Hal, and his best pal, Dennis, who have together just robbed a bank and need the coffin to stash the loot. Absurdity abounds in the dark, 1965 farce that examines attitudes surrounding death, police integrity, and the Catholic church.

This timely classic will run from March 8-17th (11 performances) at the Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St., Toronto. Casting TBA late 2017.

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JOE by Rachel Ganz

England, 1967; Joe and Kenneth live together. Following their experience in jail for a crime they believe was just an excuse to criminalize their homosexuality, Joe and Kenneth begin planning for their future. Kenneth believes they should break up to avoid further persecution but Joe believes they should die together as a desperate statement against policy. As Kenneth attempts to leave, Joe attempts to die. The domestic dispute exemplifies the ways in which public policy can affect private living and the small flat the men share fills with tension until Kenneth kills Joe with a hammer. Inspired by the real-life murder of playwright, Joe Orton.

ABOUT RACHEL GANZ: Rachel Ganz is a Toronto-based playwright. She is a recent playwriting graduate from The National Theatre School as well as the Artistic Director of Newborn Theatre and the Co-Creator of The Odds and Ends Festival. Works include: Blip/I Didn’t Need To Know You (Newborn Theatre, 2017), Plucked (Newborn Theatre, 2016), Vacuum (The National Theatre School, 2016), The Dumb War (Newborn Theatre, 2015), Teach Me (Newborn Theatre, 2014), Rhyme Reason or Otherwise (Hart House Players, 2014), Plasterface (Newborn Theatre, 2014), The Long Run (Sunnybrook Hospital/Newborn Theatre, 2014).

Staged Reading – April 8, 2018, the Social Capital Theatre, 154 Danforth Ave., Toronto

World Premiere – June 21-23, 2018 (limited engagement, 5 performances), the Alumnae Theatre Studio, 70 Berkeley St., Toronto

VAUDEVILLE REVUE – in partnership with the Revue Cinema

A one-night-only performance of vintage Vaudeville acts combined with classic silent films. Exact date TBA.

Visit http://www.bygonetheatre.com for details and updates on casting.
Tickets: available at http://www.bygonetheatre.com/tickets
Media Contact: Artistic Executive Director Emily Dix, Emily@bygonetheatre.com, 647-343-5965

Crew Spotlight: Emily Dix

Emily Dix is directing, producing, designing and stage managing HIS GIRL FRIDAY – learn more in her #crewspotlight.

25.pngEmily Dix is the Artistic Executive Director of Bygone Theatre, and is directing, stage managing, designing and producing His Girl Friday. Emily has produced all of Bygone’s shows and directed 5 of the 6, with this now being her 7th.

Bio: Emily Dix is a Toronto based theatre artist, a “jack of all trades” who has worked as a director, producer, stage manager, set & costume designer and performer. In 2008 she moved to the city to attend UofT and quickly became involved with companies on campus, like Victoria College Drama, the UC Follies, St. Mike’s Drama and Hart House Theatre. In 2012, she founded Bygone Theatre, a company which she still runs today as the Artistic Executive Director. Emily has worked as a producer for Theatre 20 and as the assistant producer at Tarragon Theatre, as well as a production assistant for Poculi Ludique Societas, the PR Manager for the Social Capital Theatre, and numerous other freelance positions. In addition to her work in theatre, Emily is a vintage lover and avid collector. She owns an Etsy shop, Tucked Away Antiques, that specializes in small vintage items and digital downloads. Emily has also dabbled in design, making web sites and posters for local artists. For past credits and more information, visit her website, www.emilydix.com.

What made you want to mount His Girl Friday?

While not a conscious decision, I realized that all of the shows Bygone had mounted so far were either dramas, or at the very least rather dark comedies. I never intended for us to stick to style like that so when I was planning our 2016/17 season I knew I wanted a comedy. I had a list of several that had caught my eye, but one day I stumbled across a list of films that were currently in the public domain, and couldn’t believe His Girl Friday was one of them! I was going to write the adaptation myself, but my uncle, Craig Dix, had recently sent me a radio of script of his he’d done, so I asked him if he’d like to do it, and the answer was an enthusiastic “yes”. It’s a great story, with a large and diverse cast, strong female lead AND in the public domain – how could I not want to put it on?

What do you love about the show?

It really is very funny. I love the fast-paced dialogue and the opportunity for cheesy, over-the-top humour. While there are certainly complications with having such a large cast, I did want to be able to include a lot of people, so the size of it appeals to me as well. Plus, I love stories that include a great romance, without it being the central part of the story. It keeps things endearing but not sappy, and makes for a plot everyone can enjoy.

Which role – director, producer, designer, stage manger – have you found most challenging? Why?

I think with this one, I’d have to say director, simply because of the size of the cast. While I did the first round of auditions very early December, it took a very long time to get everything cast; I’m glad I held out for the right actors, but it has been stressful not having the whole group. As producer, it’s always stressful because there is a lot of money on the line, but I feel like I’ve done it enough by now that I have a pretty solid idea of what it takes, and just look at past show reports to calm myself when I start worrying about whether we’ll be able to make rent.

What has been the most rewarding part of the process so far?

Seeing the advances the cast has made. Like I said, big show, lots of fast-talking dialogue, it’s not an easy play. It’s exhausting, especially for the leads. But I’ve got an amazingly talented cast, and every rehearsal they’re leaps and bounds above where they were before, so it’s super fun and rewarding to see them get comfortable in their roles and play with a lot of the silliness that is there in the script. It’s going to be a funny show.

Why should people come and see the show?

It’s so much fun. Fast-paced, goofy, it’ll have you laughing and on the edge of your seat. Not to mention we’ve got a huge cast, so if you’re in the local theatre scene, chances are you know someone involved! Come out and support Toronto Theatre.

Anything else we should know?

Sadly, it’s a very limited engagement, just one weekend. So there are only 5 chances for the public to come and see the show; Thursday March 2, 8:00pm; Friday March 3, 8:00pm; Saturday March 4, 2:00pm and 8:00pm; Sunday March 5, 2:00pm. We encourage you to buy your tickets in advance, which can be done through the Native Earth box office, at www.nativeearth.ca/hisgirlfriday. Hope to see you there!