A Very Vintage Christmas Part II: Retro Reproductions

Have yourself a merry little Christmas with these retro reproductions.

Sometimes, try as we might, we can’t find our dream vintage piece no matter how hard we look. Didn’t find what you were looking for on our post about sourcing vintage Christmas decor? Read on to see some A+ reproductions.

Tru-Tone LED Bulbs

These traditional-style glass bulbs really capture the look of mid-century string lights, with the added bonus of being LED (less power wasted, less heat generated). Now you can recreate Christmases of yore without the fear of one bad bulb knocking out the whole string of lights, or an overheated one setting your tree ablaze! We love the eco-friendly combo of glass over plastic and LED over incandescent: “Tru-Tone LED bulbs consume 0.6watt. Standard Incandescent C7 bulbs use 5 watts. That’s a whopping 88% savings. Standard Incandescent C9 bulbs use 7 watts, so you’ll save even more at 91% energy savings! Put another way, a tree with 125 C7 Tru-Tone bulbs will use 75 watts and glow just as brightly as a tree with 125 C7 incandescent bulbs consuming 625 watts! No wonder the tree served as a space heater!”

Tru-Tone bulbs consume 0.6 watt. Standard Incandescent C7 use 5 watts. That’s a whopping 88% [energy] savings!

Kurt Adler “Early Years” Ornaments

Kurt Adler’s beautiful collection of vintage-styled glass ornaments have been on the top of our wishlist for years. From mid-century indented bulbs to beautiful wartime novelty pieces, Adler’s delicate, detailed ornaments make for a stunning addition to any tree. These are available in many stores and online, but before you go to order off Amazon, we suggest checking out Retro Festive, the pop culture and Christmas store in Oakville, Ontario, just outside of Toronto. Shop local this Christmas!

Vintage Tinsel Wreaths

A mid-century Christmas isn’t complete with tinsel. Lots of tinsel. Unfortunately the loose stuff can get a bit messy, so we recommend sticking to something cleaner, like this sparkly wreath from Putti Fine Furnishings.

Light Covers

When the first Christmas lights were introduced to a captivated public in 1884, they were not only expensive, but were unrealistic for most people as many still did not have electricity in their homes. However, by 1914 the cost of lights and electricity had come down considerably, and by the 30s most families had some sort of colourful light for the holidays. I’m not sure when exactly the first shaped and figural light covers arrived on the market, but I believe I’ve seen them from at least the 1920s. Early versions were glass, and ranged from mini Santa Claus to animals, fruit and even licensed characters like Betty Boop. Today you’re more likely to find ornaments that mimic this style, but some of the classics that pop over lights are still to be found, here and there.

Are you searching for a modern take on a vintage favourite?
Let us know in the comments.

Advertisement

Author: BygoneTheatre

Bygone Theatre was founded as a collective in October of 2012, and became an incorporated not-for-profit company in October of 2015. Our mandate is to produce theatre written or set in the early 20th century, focusing on historical aspects in design and incorporating a classic cinema aesthetic. ​ In 2019 Bygone Theatre was nominated for 14 Broadway World Toronto Awards, including Best Community Theatre and Best Play (Equity). We took home a total of 5 awards, 4 of which were for The Rear Window, including Best Direction of a Play (Equity); Best Original Lighting Design; Best Leading Actor (Play, Equity); and Best Featured Actress (Play, Equity). We took a hiatus our 2020/21 season because of the COVID19 pandemic, and used that time to develop our charitable initiatives. In August of 2021 we were nominated for the Toronto Star Readers' Choice Award for Best Live Theatre. Part of our mission involves inclusion and accessibility, and we strive to allow artists of all backgrounds and levels of experience the chance to have hands-on experience in whatever capacity they are most interested in; this has included youth outreach programs for high school students interested in production design, and acting opportunities for those who have never performed onstage.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: